Chief
Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.
Deputy Chief
Carol J. Thiele, Ph.D.
ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov
Building 10, Room 1W-3750
Bethesda, MD 20892
240-760-6560

The Pediatric Oncology Branch is dedicated to improving outcomes for children and young adults with cancer and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. We conduct translational research that spans basic science to clinical trials. Our clinical studies are performed in an environment that supports our patient’s medical and emotional needs, alongside cutting edge scientific research.

Whether you are a referring physician, family member or patient with childhood cancer or neurofibromatosis, or are interested in training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch, we hope that this website will provide the information you need to access our programs.

Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.Brigitte C. Widemann, MD
Chief, Pediatric Oncology Branch
 
  • Refer a patientRefer a Patient

    Physicians should contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch by calling 240-760-6560  or 1-877-624-4878 (8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday) or email ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov 

  • clinical trialsClinical Trials

    We conduct clinical trials in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric sarcomas, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, malignant melanoma, neurofibromatosis and Phase I trials.

  • pediatric oncology fellowshipFellowship

    The Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship is a joint program of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH and Johns Hopkins University.

  • NewsTravis with Zilly the therapy dog

    Selumetinib continues to show promise in children with NF1. 
    Read more...

Our investigators and physicians realize that many challenges remain in the treatment of childhood cancers and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes but we are committed to improving outcomes for children and young adults with these diseases through cutting-edge basic and clinical research. Patients with cancer, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), NF2 or other diseases under study who are enrolled on Branch clinical trials may receive therapy at the NIH Clinical Center.

Our clinical programs and trials span early treatment studies with new targeted agents including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins, immunotherapy including tumor vaccines, and bone marrow transplantation, to studies aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancers and the conditions that predispose children to cancer. Our multidisciplinary teams specialize in the study and treatment of:

Support Services

The treatment of a childhood cancer presents extraordinary psychological, emotional and social challenges to the entire family. We offer a variety of support services to help patients and their families adapt and mobilize resources during treatment for these diseases. At the heart of these services is the personal commitment of every clinical team member to understand each young patient as a unique individual with specific needs. Team members collaborate with parents at each step in the process to be attentive to the quality of life of all family members, including siblings.  

 

refer a patientReferrals

Physicians, patients, or family members may contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday:

 

 

camp fantasticRelated Links

 

pob traineesTraining Opportunities

 

Trainees and Featured Alumni

  • James Morrow – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Adrienne Long – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Meera Murgabi – PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jerry Jaboin – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis
  • AeRang Kim – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, George Washington University and Attending Physician at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the Children’s National Medical Center

Travis with Zilly the therapy dogPediatric clinical trial supports use of selumetinib for children with neurofibromatosis type 1
 

June 8, 2018

Preliminary results from a phase II clinical trial at the Center for Cancer Research support the use of the investigational drug selumetinib for shrinking tumors in children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).  Results from the study, led by Brigitte Widemann, M.D., Chief of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, not only confirm findings from a smaller 2016 study demonstrating the drug’s ability to shrink large tumors, but also suggest the drug may improve symptoms.  Read more...


  • CCR researchers receive ASCO Annual Meeting Merit Awards
     

    May 30, 2018

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) Conquer Cancer Foundation recently announced the recipients of the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting Merit Awards. Among those receiving the awards are CCR researchers Andrea Gross, M.D., Clinical Fellow in the Pediatric Oncology Branch and Jack Shern, M.D., Assistant Clinical Investigator in the Pediatric Oncology Branch.  Read more...

  • FDA grants orphan drug status to selumetinib for neurofibromatosis type 1 treatmentTravis Carpenter

    April 23, 2018

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted orphan drug status in February to selumetinib for use in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), who often develop tumors of the peripheral nervous system. Receiving orphan drug designation is a helpful step for selumetinib  Read more...

  • Lymphoblasts from an ALL patient stained in bluePhase I clinical trial will test multi-targeted immunotherapy in common childhood cancer

    April 10, 2018

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy targeting the protein CD19 has shown promise in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CD22-CAR T-cell therapy has yielded similarly encouraging results, but many patients relapse after either therapy. In an upcoming phase I clinical trial, Center for Cancer Research investigators will test a new strategy—treating patients with a CAR T-cell therapy that targets CD19 and CD22 simultaneously.  Read more...

  • Hands - IstockClinical trial aims to improve outcomes for children and young adults with primary brain tumors

    March 6, 2018

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are the most common solid tumors among children and account for up to 25 percent of all childhood cancer cases. With few treatment options available at the time of recurrence or progression, this multicenter study will test the safety and efficacy of a drug that boosts the function of the immune system to fight tumors.  Read more...

About

The Pediatric Oncology Branch is dedicated to improving outcomes for children and young adults with cancer and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. We conduct translational research that spans basic science to clinical trials. Our clinical studies are performed in an environment that supports our patient’s medical and emotional needs, alongside cutting edge scientific research.

Whether you are a referring physician, family member or patient with childhood cancer or neurofibromatosis, or are interested in training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch, we hope that this website will provide the information you need to access our programs.

Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.Brigitte C. Widemann, MD
Chief, Pediatric Oncology Branch
 
  • Refer a patientRefer a Patient

    Physicians should contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch by calling 240-760-6560  or 1-877-624-4878 (8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday) or email ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov 

  • clinical trialsClinical Trials

    We conduct clinical trials in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric sarcomas, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, malignant melanoma, neurofibromatosis and Phase I trials.

  • pediatric oncology fellowshipFellowship

    The Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship is a joint program of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH and Johns Hopkins University.

  • NewsTravis with Zilly the therapy dog

    Selumetinib continues to show promise in children with NF1. 
    Read more...

Referrals

refer a patientReferrals

Physicians, patients, or family members may contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday:

 

 

camp fantasticRelated Links

 

For Patients

Our investigators and physicians realize that many challenges remain in the treatment of childhood cancers and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes but we are committed to improving outcomes for children and young adults with these diseases through cutting-edge basic and clinical research. Patients with cancer, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), NF2 or other diseases under study who are enrolled on Branch clinical trials may receive therapy at the NIH Clinical Center.

Our clinical programs and trials span early treatment studies with new targeted agents including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins, immunotherapy including tumor vaccines, and bone marrow transplantation, to studies aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancers and the conditions that predispose children to cancer. Our multidisciplinary teams specialize in the study and treatment of:

Support Services

The treatment of a childhood cancer presents extraordinary psychological, emotional and social challenges to the entire family. We offer a variety of support services to help patients and their families adapt and mobilize resources during treatment for these diseases. At the heart of these services is the personal commitment of every clinical team member to understand each young patient as a unique individual with specific needs. Team members collaborate with parents at each step in the process to be attentive to the quality of life of all family members, including siblings.  

 

Teams

For Trainees

pob traineesTraining Opportunities

 

Trainees and Featured Alumni

  • James Morrow – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Adrienne Long – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Meera Murgabi – PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jerry Jaboin – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis
  • AeRang Kim – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, George Washington University and Attending Physician at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the Children’s National Medical Center

Our Science

News

Travis with Zilly the therapy dogPediatric clinical trial supports use of selumetinib for children with neurofibromatosis type 1
 

June 8, 2018

Preliminary results from a phase II clinical trial at the Center for Cancer Research support the use of the investigational drug selumetinib for shrinking tumors in children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).  Results from the study, led by Brigitte Widemann, M.D., Chief of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, not only confirm findings from a smaller 2016 study demonstrating the drug’s ability to shrink large tumors, but also suggest the drug may improve symptoms.  Read more...


  • CCR researchers receive ASCO Annual Meeting Merit Awards
     

    May 30, 2018

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) Conquer Cancer Foundation recently announced the recipients of the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting Merit Awards. Among those receiving the awards are CCR researchers Andrea Gross, M.D., Clinical Fellow in the Pediatric Oncology Branch and Jack Shern, M.D., Assistant Clinical Investigator in the Pediatric Oncology Branch.  Read more...

  • FDA grants orphan drug status to selumetinib for neurofibromatosis type 1 treatmentTravis Carpenter

    April 23, 2018

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted orphan drug status in February to selumetinib for use in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), who often develop tumors of the peripheral nervous system. Receiving orphan drug designation is a helpful step for selumetinib  Read more...

  • Lymphoblasts from an ALL patient stained in bluePhase I clinical trial will test multi-targeted immunotherapy in common childhood cancer

    April 10, 2018

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy targeting the protein CD19 has shown promise in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CD22-CAR T-cell therapy has yielded similarly encouraging results, but many patients relapse after either therapy. In an upcoming phase I clinical trial, Center for Cancer Research investigators will test a new strategy—treating patients with a CAR T-cell therapy that targets CD19 and CD22 simultaneously.  Read more...