Human breast cancer cells arrested in the blood vessels of zebrafish larvae.

Tumor cells in transparent fish reveal physical and molecular factors that determine metastasis sites

CCR researchers used zebrafish to discover that particular sites colonized by migrating tumor cells are determined by both the physical architecture of tissue and the cells’ molecular compatibility with their microenvironment. Read more...

Cervical cancer cells

FDA grants breakthrough therapy designation of new TIL therapy for advanced cervical cancer

Aug 16, 2019

In May 2019, the FDA granted breakthrough therapy designation to a tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy technology known as LN-145 to treat advanced cervical cancer based on data presented by CCR collaborator Iovance Biotherapeutics.  Read more...

Ken Kraemer

Ken Kraemer featured in Associated Press

Aug 13, 2019

Ken Kraemer, M.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, was recently featured in an Associated Press article on xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) prevalence in Morocco. In the article, Dr. Kraemer discussed the magnitude of people affected by XP in North Africa, and his research nurse, Deborah Tamura, discussed practical tips XP support groups shared during a meeting in London last year. Read more...

Ken Kraemer featured in Associated Press
B cells imaged using super-resolution microscopy

In patients with severe chronic lymphocytic leukemia, B cells get stuck in hyperactive mode

Aug 5, 2019

Analyzing how cancer cells respond to stress signals could help clinicians assess the severity of disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, according to new research from the Center for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Read more...

Amy Leblanc

Amy LeBlanc featured in Wired

Jul 22, 2019

Amy LeBlanc, D.V.M., Director of the Center for Cancer Research’s Comparative Oncology Program, was recently featured in a Wired article that discusses the role of dogs in human cancer research. In the article, Dr. LeBlanc says that the comparative oncology Cancer Moonshot projects “… are developing very critical, biologically rich information in patients who happen to be dogs.” Read more...

Amy LeBlanc featured in Wired
Cell nuclei

Landmark discovery: H2AX as a sensor of DNA damage

Jul 16, 2019

William Bonner’s curiosity about histones led to the discovery that the protein H2AX is altered in response to harmful DNA damage called a double-strand break. This powerful tool has led to breakthroughs in both basic and clinical cancer research.  Read more...

Landmark discovery: H2AX as a sensor of DNA damage
Human embryonic stem cells

New mechanism for regulating differentiation discovered in human embryonic stem cells

Jul 15, 2019

Researchers in the Center for Cancer Research have discovered a new mechanism involving a nuclease complex called the RNA exosome that represses differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. This represents the first time this mechanism has been studied in these cells. Read more...

Ying Zhang

Ying Zhang’s research featured in new NIH Intramural Research Program blog

Jul 15, 2019

Ying Zhang, Ph.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, is featured in a new NIH Intramural Research Program blog post. The blog post, “Scientific Detour Advances Understanding of Fatty Liver Disease," focuses on Dr. Zhang’s research, including a recent study that could eventually lead to preventing or reversing unhealthy amounts of fat storage in the liver.  Read more...

Ying Zhang’s research featured in new NIH Intramural Research Program blog
Doug Lowy headshot

Doug Lowy receives Distinguished Scientist Award from the Association of American Cancer Institutes

Jul 15, 2019

Doug Lowy, M.D., Acting Director of NCI and Chief of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, has been selected to receive the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI) Distinguished Scientist Award. AACI is recognizing Dr. Lowy for his long-term research on the molecular biology of tumor viruses and growth regulation, his role in enabling the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and his exploration of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and their signaling pathways. Read more...

Doug Lowy receives Distinguished Scientist Award from the Association of American Cancer Institutes
RNA types

Gene-regulating microRNAs gain control over hundreds of new genes with common sequence modification

Jul 11, 2019

MicroRNAs have an enormous influence over what happens inside cells. By blocking the activity of specific sets of genes, they help control virtually every known biological pathway and process. Disruptions in microRNAs have been linked to many diseases, and understanding how these molecules function, which genes they control and how they themselves are regulated are high priorities in cancer research.  Read more...

Presidential seal

CCR scientists receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Jul 11, 2019

John Brognard, Ph.D., Investigator in the Laboratory of Cell and Developmental SignalingRomina Goldszmid, Ph.D., Investigator in the Cancer and Inflammation Program, and Anish Thomas, M.D., Investigator in the Developmental Therapeutics Branch, are recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE is the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government to outstanding scientists and engineers who are beginning their independent research careers and who show exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology. Established in 1996, the PECASE acknowledges the contributions scientists and engineers have made to the advancement of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education and to community service as demonstrated by scientific leadership, public education and community outreach. Read more...

CCR scientists receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

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