New mechanism for regulating differentiation discovered in human embryonic stem cells

Researchers in the Center for Cancer Research have discovered a new mechanism involving a nuclease complex called the RNA exosome that represses differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. This represents the first time this mechanism has been studied in these cells. Read more...

Ying Zhang

Ying Zhang’s research featured in new NIH Intramural Research Program blog

Jul 15, 2019

Ying Zhang, Ph.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, is featured in a new NIH Intramural Research Program blog post. The blog post, “Scientific Detour Advances Understanding of Fatty Liver Disease," focuses on Dr. Zhang’s research, including a recent study that could eventually lead to preventing or reversing unhealthy amounts of fat storage in the liver.  Read more...

Ying Zhang’s research featured in new NIH Intramural Research Program blog
Doug Lowy headshot

Doug Lowy receives Distinguished Scientist Award from the Association of American Cancer Institutes

Jul 15, 2019

Doug Lowy, M.D., Acting Director of NCI and Chief of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, has been selected to receive the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI) Distinguished Scientist Award. AACI is recognizing Dr. Lowy for his long-term research on the molecular biology of tumor viruses and growth regulation, his role in enabling the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and his exploration of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and their signaling pathways. Read more...

Doug Lowy receives Distinguished Scientist Award from the Association of American Cancer Institutes
RNA types

Gene-regulating microRNAs gain control over hundreds of new genes with common sequence modification

Jul 11, 2019

MicroRNAs have an enormous influence over what happens inside cells. By blocking the activity of specific sets of genes, they help control virtually every known biological pathway and process. Disruptions in microRNAs have been linked to many diseases, and understanding how these molecules function, which genes they control and how they themselves are regulated are high priorities in cancer research.  Read more...

Presidential seal

CCR scientists receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Jul 11, 2019

John Brognard, Ph.D., Investigator in the Laboratory of Cell and Developmental SignalingRomina Goldszmid, Ph.D., Investigator in the Cancer and Inflammation Program, and Anish Thomas, M.D., Investigator in the Developmental Therapeutics Branch, are recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE is the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government to outstanding scientists and engineers who are beginning their independent research careers and who show exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology. Established in 1996, the PECASE acknowledges the contributions scientists and engineers have made to the advancement of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education and to community service as demonstrated by scientific leadership, public education and community outreach. Read more...

CCR scientists receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers
Hernandez clinical trial conversation

Clinical Trial Conversation: Jonathan Hernandez describes metastatic colorectal cancer clinical trial

Jul 8, 2019

Colorectal cancer (CRC) starts in the colon and/or rectum and often metastasizes, or spreads, to many sites in the body. In a certain set of patients, however, CRC metastasizes only to the liver. Jonathan Hernandez, M.D., of the Surgical Oncology Program, is leading a new clinical trial to study how well CRC patients with liver-only metastases respond to treatment with a hepatic artery infusion pump. Dr. Hernandez describes the trial in this new video. Read more...

Clinical Trial Conversation: Jonathan Hernandez describes metastatic colorectal cancer clinical trial
Jonathan Hernandez

Jonathan Hernandez discusses surgical oncology with Behind the Knife podcast

Jul 2, 2019

Jonathan Hernandez, M.D., Investigator in the Surgical Oncology Program, was recently featured in a Behind the Knife podcast. During the episode, Dr. Hernandez discussed the surgical oncology match process and his research on ex vivo tissue preservation to study tumors. The full podcast is available online. Read more...

Jonathan Hernandez discusses surgical oncology with Behind the Knife podcast
rhabdosarcoma cells

Sarcoma Awareness Month

Jul 1, 2019

July is Sarcoma Awareness Month and we are highlighting our researchers who are advancing research discovery in this field. Read more...

Combination IL-15

Clinical trial tests immunotherapy combination to treat T-cell cancers

Jun 28, 2019

The Center for Cancer Research’s Lymphoid Malignancies Branch is testing a combination treatment for patients whose mature T-cell cancer has returned after therapy or has not responded to therapy using avelumab, an immunotherapy agent that enhances the activity of immune cells and blocks a protein pathway that allows cancer cells to hide from the immune system. Read more...

HPV 16

Clinical trial will test immunotherapy against precancerous vulvar lesions

Jun 27, 2019

Scientists at the Center for Cancer Research are launching a phase II clinical trial to evaluate the effect of a single immunotherapy treatment on precancerous lesions that put women at risk for vulvar cancer. Like the cell-based immunotherapies now used to treat certain blood cancers, the experimental treatment aims to use patients’ own immune cells to fight disease. Read more...

T cells

Gastrointestinal tumors harbor T cells that recognize patients’ unique tumor antigens

Jun 25, 2019

CCR scientists, led by Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., have determined that many common gastrointestinal tumors bear mutations capable of eliciting an immune response, suggesting that immunotherapy could be an effective way to treat these common cancers.  Read more...

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