Cartoon of patients receiving stem cells
Clinical trial evaluates blood stem cell transplantation for patients with T-cell disorders

T cells, a type of white blood cell, develop from stem cells, mature in the thymus gland and play a key role in human immunity by protecting the body from infection. They may also help to fight cancer. People whose T cells fail to properly develop or function can develop imbalances in the immune system that lead to cancer, autoimmune disease and other problems. Jennifer Kanakry, M.D., of the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch is leading a study that transplants allogeneic blood-forming stem cells from healthy donors into patients with T-cell disorders. Read more...

Chongyi Chen, Ph.D.

Chongyi Chen appointed as Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator

Oct 5, 2018

Chongyi Chen, Ph.D., has joined the Laboratory of  Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as a Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator. Dr. Chen joins us from Harvard University. His research focuses on the interface between DNA sequence, chromosome organization and gene expression in both bulk samples and single cells from a genome-wide perspective. Read more...

Chongyi Chen appointed as Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator
Andres Lebensohn, Ph.D.

Andres Lebensohn appointed as Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator

Oct 5, 2018

Andres Lebensohn, Ph.D., has joined the Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology as a Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator. Dr. Lebensohn joins us from Stanford University. His research focuses on understanding how signaling pathways are used, reused and repurposed to drive the myriad different cellular processes that give rise to tissues and organs during embryonic development and maintain them in adult life.  Read more...

Andres Lebensohn appointed as Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator
Staph infection

Study reveals function of protein crucial to survival of Staph infections

Oct 2, 2018

A team led by Kumaran Ramamurthi, Ph.D.,Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, has identified why the GpsB protein is essential for the survival of Staphylococcus aureus, a leading source of infection in cancer patients in hospital settings. These findings, published in eLife, point to GpsB as a possible antibiotic target. Read more...

breast cancer in a dish

Our breast cancer research

Oct 1, 2018

To recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month this October, we are highlighting our researchers who are making discoveries in this field. Read more…

Mai in Afghanistan receiving the Bronze Star from Lieutenant General Michael Williamson

Former world-class hammer thrower battles diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)

Sep 28, 2018

In August of 2013, eight months into his volunteer deployment in Afghanistan, Michael Mai noticed a small lump between his neck and shoulder. The former world-class hammer thrower initially brushed it off as nothing but was later diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Mai came to NIH and received treatment from Mark Roschewski, M.D., Clinical Director of the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, that ultimately cleared him of the disease. Read more...

Kenneth Kraemer

Kenneth Kraemer receives 2018 Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society Award

Sep 25, 2018

Kenneth Kraemer, M.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, has received the 2018 Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society (EMGS) Award. The annual award is given in recognition of outstanding research contributions in environmental mutagenisis. Dr. Kraemer is presenting the plenary lecture at the 2018 EMGS Annual Meeting on September 25, 2018, in San Antonio, Texas. Read more...

Kenneth Kraemer receives 2018 Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society Award
Barry O'Keefe

Barry O’Keefe featured in ShareAmerica article

Sep 19, 2018

Barry O’Keefe, Ph.D., Acting Chief of the Molecular Targets Program and Chief of the Natural Products Branch of the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, was featured in a ShareAmerica article. Dr. O’Keefe, along with an international team of scientists, worked together to figure out how to combine three HIV-blocking proteins into ordinary seeds of rice that could be turned into an ointment to prevent HIV infections. In the article, Dr. O’Keefe discusses natural products, particularly a powerful protein in marine red algae from New Zealand that he first showed in 2005 could work to kill HIV-related microbes. Read more...

Barry O’Keefe featured in ShareAmerica article
Multiple myeloma

Early-phase clinical trial to test new CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma

Sep 18, 2018

Center for Cancer Research investigators led by James Kochenderfer, M.D., of the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, are conducting a clinical trial to test a new chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in patients whose multiple myeloma has persisted or relapsed despite standard therapy. Their goal is to develop a CAR T-cell therapy that provides lasting remission of a disease that remains highly resistant to current treatments. Read more...

Nirali Shah

Nirali Shah featured on follow-up NPR “Shots” blog post

Sep 17, 2018

Nirali N. Shah, M.D., MHSc, Associate Research Physician in the Pediatric Oncology Branch, was recently featured in a follow-up story to a previous NPR “Shots” blog post. The post follows Aaron, a 20-year-old man from Lucedale, Mississippi, in an early-stage CAR-T clinical trial. This post revealed how Aaron responded to his latest round of treatment.  Read more...

Nirali Shah featured on follow-up NPR “Shots” blog post
leukemia

Moxetumomab pasudotox becomes first FDA-approved drug for resistant hairy cell leukemia

Sep 14, 2018

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved moxetumomab pasudotox for the treatment of some patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). A CCR researcher team led by Ira Pastan, M.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), discovered the drug, which was later licensed to MedImmune/AstraZeneca for clinical development. Robert Kreitman, M.D., Senior Investigator in LMB, led the clinical trials that showed moxetumomab to be an effective option for patients with relapsed or refractory HCL. Read more...

Moxetumomab pasudotox becomes first FDA-approved drug for resistant hairy cell leukemia

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