Study characterizes RNA molecule’s response to DNA damage in cancer cells

Researchers led by Ashish Lal, Ph.D., Investigator in the Genetics Branch, have shown that when the DNA in human colon cancer cells is damaged, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of genes that halt growth, which allows the cells to repair the damage and promote survival. Their findings suggest an important pro-survival function of a lncRNA in cancer cells. Read more...

Center for Cancer Research hosts 10th Annual GIST Clinic

Posted: Jul 14, 2017

Patients and specialists from around the world gathered for the 10th Annual Pediatric and Wildtype GIST Clinic, which took place Wednesday, July 5 through Friday, July 7, 2017 at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Occurring once a year, the clinic convenes clinicians, research scientists and advocates from across the country to consult with patients who have GIST. Christine Gonzales, a GIST clinic patient from New Mexico, says, “It’s been super amazing because I’ve never talked to a specialist about this cancer.” Learn more...

Center for Cancer Research hosts 10th Annual GIST Clinic

CCR researchers receive Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator awards

Posted: Jul 13, 2017

Three CCR researchers, Stephanie Harmon, Ph.D., Fatima Karzai, M.D., and David VanderWeele, M.D., Ph.D., received 2017 Young Investigator Awards from the Prostate Cancer Foundation on July 10, 2017. The Young Investigator Awards support early-career scientists who are researching promising therapies for prostate cancer.

CCR researchers receive Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator awards

Bacterial communities living on the skin of eczema patients vary with disease severity

Posted: Jul 5, 2017

A new study published in Science Translational Medicine reveals that strains of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) can dominate the skin of patients with eczema. This discovery could bring clinicians one step closer to understanding possible targets for treatment. Learn more...

Bacterial communities living on the skin of eczema patients vary with disease severity

Surgery Branch recruiting patients to study new treatment for cancers with RAS mutations

Posted: Jul 5, 2017

RAS is a family of proteins that send signals to genes involved in cell growth and is mutated in approximately a quarter of all human cancers. James Yang, M.D., of the Surgery Branch is leading a team of investigators who have generated a special T-cell receptor from mouse cells that can recognize a mutation of RAS that is found in many human cancer cells. The goal is to determine if a new therapy is safe and can help shrink tumors that have the G12V RAS mutation. Read more...

Surgery Branch recruiting patients to study new treatment for cancers with RAS mutations

Using radioactive drugs could lead to better imaging of prostate cancer

Posted: Jun 30, 2017

Medical imaging (x-ray, ultrasound, MRI, CT, PET scan) is a noninvasive way to view the internal structures of the body. However, these tools are not ideal for detecting cancer that has spread, or metastasized, because the precise location of these cancer cells is unknown. Researchers are now testing an experimental radiotracer called 18F-DCFPyL to help find sites of cancer in the body.  Learn more...

Using radioactive drugs could lead to better imaging of prostate cancer

Sarcoma Awareness Month

Posted: Jun 30, 2017

To recognize Sarcoma Awareness Month this July, we are highlighting our researchers who are advancing research discovery in this field. Learn more...

Sarcoma Awareness Month

POB/JHU trainee awarded Teaching Fellow of the Year

Posted: Jun 29, 2017

Julia Cohen, M.D., from the Pediatric Oncology Branch (POB), received the Teaching Fellow of the Year award from the Johns Hopkins Hospital house staff. Julia is a Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellow; a joint program of the POB and Johns Hopkins University. Fellows receive combined clinical training during their first year at both Johns Hopkins Hospital and the NIH Clinical Center. Nirali Shah, M.D., Staff Clinician in POB, said, “This is a huge testament to her kind, caring nature and compassion with which she treats everyone.”

POB/JHU trainee awarded Teaching Fellow of the Year

2nd International Gliomatosis Cerebri Working Group Conference

Posted: Jun 27, 2017

On June 22-23, the NIH hosted the 2nd Gliomatosis Cerebri International Conference that brought together leading neuro-oncologists, neuroscientists and families who have lost a child to the disease. Learn more...

2nd International Gliomatosis Cerebri Working Group Conference

Molecular profiles suggest two types of liver cancer should be treated as one

Posted: Jun 26, 2017

A comprehensive molecular analysis of two types of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), has identified common molecular subtypes that can be found among patients with either disease. Although HCC and ICC are considered separate diseases, the finding suggests that a unified clinical approach could benefit patients with both types of liver cancer.  Read more...

Molecular profiles suggest two types of liver cancer should be treated as one

New clinical trial studies the addition of immunotherapy to chemotherapy for patients with biliary tract carcinoma

Posted: Jun 22, 2017

New clinical trial studies immunotherapy and chemotherapy combination for patients with bile duct cancer for whom surgery is not an option.  Learn more...

New clinical trial studies the addition of immunotherapy to chemotherapy for patients with biliary tract carcinoma

Pages