Finding relief in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria: A patient’s journey from Puerto Rico to the National Institutes of Health

Jesus Garces-Soto and his wife, Lyssette Santiago, never expected to travel from Puerto Rico to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. On the same day that Hurricane Maria, a storm with 150-mile-per-hour winds, made direct landfall on Puerto Rico in 2017, Garces-Soto needed to seek treatment for an infection related to bladder cancer. Destruction from the hurricane took out the hospital’s electricity, and with no generator, it was difficult to provide adequate care. With help from members of the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, Garces-Soto and Santiago were flown to NIH where Garces-Soto is receiving care from Andrea Apolo, M.D., Investigator and Lasker Clinical Research Scholar in the Genitourinary Malignancies Branch. Read more...

Yolland Jackson

Fearless in the face of small cell lung cancer

Posted: Nov 21, 2017

Yolland Jackson considers herself a soldier who is determined to fight her small cell lung cancer until the bitter end. In discussing her decision to enroll in a phase II clinical trial led by Investigator Anish Thomas, M.B.B.S., M.D., in the Developmental Therapeutics Branch, she shared some of her reasoning with him. “This is bigger than me. This is happening to me because someone is going to come after me that will need this treatment. Whatever you need to do, I’m in.” Read more…

Fearless in the face of small cell lung cancer
Headshot of Julia Friend

Why CCR: A conversation with Physician Assistant Julia Friend

Posted: Nov 17, 2017

"Where else can you make such a profound difference not only for the individual now, but for those who come in the future? It is hard work, good work and worth doing well.” Physician Assistant Julia Friend answers our questions about why she loves working for CCR. Read more...

Why CCR: A conversation with Physician Assistant Julia Friend
Doctors with pediatric patient

Pediatric clinical trial studies antibody treatment for various types of solid tumors

Posted: Nov 16, 2017

A clinical trial for pediatric patients will test the safety and efficacy of enoblituzumab in solid tumors that express a specific protein, including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Wilms tumor, or desmoplastic small round cell tumor. Read more... 

Pediatric clinical trial studies antibody treatment for various types of solid tumors
GRL-142

Preclinical study shows drug has extreme potency against multidrug-resistant HIV variants

Posted: Nov 15, 2017

CCR investigators and colleagues have developed an anti-HIV drug, GRL-142, which at low concentrations block the replication of various wild-type and multidrug-resistant HIV strains. The drug also reaches high concentrations in a rat’s brain, suggesting it may prevent HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Read more…

Preclinical study shows drug has extreme potency against multidrug-resistant HIV variants
B-cell lymphoma cells

Clinical trial for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies now recruiting

Posted: Nov 14, 2017

B-cell lymphomas are blood cancers that affect B-cells, white blood cells that develop and mature in bone marrow in the core of most bones. Mark Roschewski, M.D., of the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch is leading a study of a new treatment for B-cell lymphomas that have not responded to radiation and chemotherapy. Read more...

Clinical trial for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies now recruiting
Dr. Shalabi at awards banquet

Haneen Shalabi receives The Children’s Cancer Foundation Next Gen Award

Posted: Nov 13, 2017

Haneen Shalabi, D.O., a Physician in the Pediatric Oncology Branch, received the 2017 Next Gen Award from the Children’s Cancer Foundation, Inc (CCF). As the highest award CCF presents to individual researchers, the Next Gen Award recognizes young investigators who are committed to pursuing a long-term career in pediatric oncology research. Read more... 

Haneen Shalabi receives The Children’s Cancer Foundation Next Gen Award
Skull xray

CCR researchers leading initiative to develop liquid biopsy technology

Posted: Nov 13, 2017

Many cancer experts predict the newest innovation in cancer treatment will be the development of blood tests, called liquid or blood biopsies, that can monitor the growth of tumors by analyzing DNA shed from tumors into the bloodstream. A recent article from Axios highlights NCI’s initiative to support the development and validation of these tests through a partnership with engineers and clinical experts. Mark Roschewski, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, notes there is little doubt these tests will be available soon and says the “only question is when and at what breadth.” Read the full story…

CCR researchers leading initiative to develop liquid biopsy technology
prostate cancer imaging

A novel imaging approach for prostate cancer is tested in new clinical trial

Posted: Nov 9, 2017

Prostate cancer patients who have failed standard radiation therapy have the options of surgery, radioactive seed implantation or cryoablation. Deborah Citrin, M.D., of the Radiation Oncology Branch is leading a study of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat prostate cancer that has recurred locally after standard radiation therapy. The goal of this study is to use a novel imaging approach to guide treatment and to define the best dose of SBRT for patients whose prostate cancer has recurred after standard radiotherapy. Read more...

A novel imaging approach for prostate cancer is tested in new clinical trial
Inflammatory cells in mouse brain

Serendipitous discovery in mice links inflammation directly to stroke

Posted: Nov 8, 2017

In 30 percent to 40 percent of stroke cases, doctors can’t identify the biological cause. Certain risk factors for stroke, such as smoking and diabetes, cause inflammation. Scientists have long suspected that chronic inflammation can in turn trigger a stroke, but they have not made a direct link. Now, CCR researchers have reported that experiments with mice suggest inflammation alone can lead to stroke. Read more…

Serendipitous discovery in mice links inflammation directly to stroke
Pancreatic cancer cells

New clinical trial explores precision treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer

Posted: Nov 7, 2017

A new phase II clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a drug called selumetinib for treating patients with advanced pancreatic cancer whose tumors harbor a specific genetic marker has opened at the Center for Cancer Research and is currently recruiting participants. Read more...

New clinical trial explores precision treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer

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