Early-phase clinical trial to test new CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma

Center for Cancer Research investigators led by James Kochenderfer, M.D., of the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, are conducting a clinical trial to test a new chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in patients whose multiple myeloma has persisted or relapsed despite standard therapy. Their goal is to develop a CAR T-cell therapy that provides lasting remission of a disease that remains highly resistant to current treatments. Read more...

Steve Rosenberg

Steve Rosenberg featured in STAT article

Aug 20, 2018

Steve Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of the Surgery Branch, has recently been featured in a STAT article. In the article, Dr. Rosenberg discusses tumor infiltrating lymphcytes (TILs), an immunotherapy comprised of a mix of cells, that target different tumor antigens. He is a pioneer of TIL therapy and has been continuing to improve it over the last 20 years.  Read more...

Steve Rosenberg featured in STAT article
gene therapy

CCR-led research team develops predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma

Aug 20, 2018

Researchers have developed a predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma. The study, authored by scientists from CCR’s new Cancer Data Science Laboratory and their extramural colleagues was published on August 20, 2018, in Nature Medicine, describes a gene expression predictor that can indicate whether melanoma in a specific patient is likely to respond to treatment with a type of immunotherapy known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. Read more...

CCR-led research team develops predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma
Nirali Shah

Nirali Shah featured on NPR “Shots” blog

Aug 16, 2018

Nirali N. Shah, M.D., Associate Research Physician in the Pediatric Oncology Branch,was recently featured in NPR’s “Shots” blog. In the post, Dr. Shah discusses CAR-T therapies, specifically an experimental version designed to reduce the risk of recurrence. Dr. Shah and her team are modifying patients’ own immune cells to recognize and attack two targets in leukemia cells instead of one in hopes of reducing the risk of relapse. Read more...

Nirali Shah featured on NPR “Shots” blog
Stem cell

New findings in Cell Stem Cell focus on Id1 and its effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs)

Aug 16, 2018

Jonathan R. Keller, Ph.D., Senior Investigator in the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, and others recently published findings in Cell Stem Cell focused on Id1, an inhibitor of DNA binding, and its effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are cells that form blood cellular components. These findings may have application for treatments such as bone marrow transplantation.  Read more...

New findings in Cell Stem Cell focus on Id1 and its effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs)
Steve Rosenberg

Steve Rosenberg receives 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research

Aug 15, 2018

Steve Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of the Surgery Branch, will receive the 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research for his pioneering role in the development of immunotherapy to treat cancer. The annual award recognizes “those who have altered the course of medical research.” He will share the honor with fellow immunotherapy researchers James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Carl H. June, M.D. The prize will be awarded during a celebration on September 26 in Albany, New York.  Read more...

Steve Rosenberg receives 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research
lymphoma cells

DNA-damaging drugs show promise in helping treat dogs with lymphoma

Aug 6, 2018

DNA-damaging drugs called TOP1 inhibitors are widely used to treat various cancers, but they have limitations. A clinical trial in dogs with lymphoma suggests that three alternative drug candidates with a similar mechanism may be effective. Read more...

RNA

Registration is now open for the 2018 CCR RNA Biology Workshop

Aug 3, 2018

RNA biology has emerged as one of the most influential areas in modern biology and biomedicine. The CCR is home to a wide spectrum of work in RNA biology ranging from elucidating RNA biogenesis and structure, identifying functions for various classes of RNAs, establishing the role of RNA in disease and exploring RNA-based and RNA-targeted therapies.  The goal of this fourth retreat hosted by the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology is to enhance interactions amongst PIs, fellows and staff working on RNA and to foster new collaborations and synergies amongst CCR laboratories interested in RNA biology. The workshop will feature our keynote speaker, Dr. Karla Neugebauer, Yale University, and several talks selected from submitted abstracts. Fellows, staff scientists and trainees (including Leidos) are encouraged to submit an abstract for consideration.  We also hope to catalyze interactions between basic and clinician researchers at this workshop. Learn more...

Registration is now open for the 2018 CCR RNA Biology Workshop
illustration of a collapsed replication fork

Study reveals regions where harmful DNA breaks are most likely to occur

Aug 2, 2018

Center for Cancer Research investigators have discovered that double-strand DNA breaks—the most dangerous form of DNA damage, which can lead to cancer—tend to occur during DNA replication at regions known as poly(dA:dT) tracts. Their findings represent a first step toward investigating ways to prevent these harmful DNA breaks. Read more...

Tom

Prostate cancer journey leads to immunotherapy

Aug 1, 2018

A 14-year battle with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer led Tom to the doors of the NIH Clinical Center. A combination immunotherapy clinical trial led by James Gulley, M.D., Ph.D., turned the tide in his fight and led to a passion for advising prostate cancer patients. Read more...

John Schiller

John Schiller discusses HPV on iBiology video

Jul 31, 2018

John Schiller, Ph.D., Deputy Chief of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology and NIH Distinguished Investigator, is featured in a video on the iBiology website. In the video, Dr. Schiller provides an overview of human papillomavirus (HPV) virus and infection, a comparision of the three FDA-approved vaccines against HPV and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. Dr. Schiller and his co-PI, Douglas Lowy, M.D., led the initial development and characterization of HPV vaccines. Read more...

John Schiller discusses HPV on iBiology video

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