Chief
Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.
Email Address
ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov

Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute

Building 10, Room 1W-3750
Bethesda, MD 20892
301-496-4256

The Pediatric Oncology Branch is dedicated to improving outcomes for children and young adults with cancer and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. We conduct translational research that spans basic science to clinical trials. Our clinical studies are performed in an environment that supports our patient’s medical and emotional needs, alongside cutting edge scientific research.

Whether you are a referring physician, family member or patient with childhood cancer or neurofibromatosis, or are interested in training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch, we hope that this website will provide the information you need to access our programs.

Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.Brigitte C. Widemann, MD
Chief, Pediatric Oncology Branch
 
  • Refer a patientRefer a Patient

    Physicians should contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch by calling 301-496-4256  or 1-877-624-4878 (8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday) or email ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov 

  • clinical trialsClinical Trials

    We conduct clinical trials in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric sarcomas, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, malignant melanoma, neurofibromatosis and Phase I trials.

  • pediatric oncology fellowshipFellowship

    The Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship is a joint program of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH and Johns Hopkins University.

  • News

    A novel target for high-risk neuroblastoma has been identified in pre-clinical research.  Learn more...

Our investigators and physicians realize that many challenges remain in the treatment of childhood cancers and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes but we are committed to improving outcomes for children and young adults with these diseases through cutting-edge basic and clinical research. Patients with cancer, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), NF2 or other diseases under study who are enrolled on Branch clinical trials may receive therapy at the NIH Clinical Center.

Our clinical programs and trials span early treatment studies with new targeted agents including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins, immunotherapy including tumor vaccines, and bone marrow transplantation, to studies aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancers and the conditions that predispose children to cancer. Our multidisciplinary teams specialize in the study and treatment of:

Support Services

The treatment of a childhood cancer presents extraordinary psychological, emotional and social challenges to the entire family. We offer a variety of support services to help patients and their families adapt and mobilize resources during treatment for these diseases. At the heart of these services is the personal commitment of every clinical team member to understand each young patient as a unique individual with specific needs. Team members collaborate with parents at each step in the process to be attentive to the quality of life of all family members, including siblings.  

 

refer a patientReferrals

Physicians, patients, or family members may contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday:

 

 

camp fantasticRelated Links

 

pob traineesTraining Opportunities

 

Trainees and Featured Alumni

  • James Morrow – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Adrienne Long – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Meera Murgabi – PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jerry Jaboin – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis
  • AeRang Kim – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, George Washington University and Attending Physician at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the Children’s National Medical Center

Novel target for high-risk neuroblastoma identified in pre-clinical research
 

January 9, 2017

Pre-clinical research by investigators at the Center for Cancer Research have identified a number of novel epigenetic targets for high-risk neuroblastoma and validated a promising new targeted inhibitor in pre-clinical models.  Read more...

 

  • Brigitte Widemann leads early-phase trial that shows drug shrinks NF1 tumors
     

    December 28, 2016

    Brigitte Widemann, Chief of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, led an led an early-phase clinical trial testing the oral drug selumetinib on children with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas. The trial results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Dec. 28, 2016, showed participants of this trial tolerated the drug and most responded with tumor shrinkage.“Some may say that a 20 percent volume reduction is too small to be meaningful, but to me, just stopping the growth of these devastating tumors is an important achievement,” Widemann says. “The difference we see in these patients is truly unprecedented.” Read more...

     

  • Lori Wiener discusses psychosocial impacts of childhood cancersDr. Lori Wiener

    November 14, 2016

    Lori Wiener, co-director of the Behavioral Health Core and head of the Psychosocial Support and Research Program, was quoted in HemOnc Today on the evolution of psychosocial care for cancer patients. She says that providing psychosocial care to patients can help improve their overall care. “We have to communicate information to pediatric patients in a way that is truthful and developmentally appropriate, and we need to be able to include them in medical decision-making in an age-appropriate way,” she says. “Providing family centered care is essential. The diagnosis of cancer in a child is a life-changing event for everyone in the family and attention to ongoing parental and family needs is required for optimal psychosocial care to be provided.”

  • 8-year-old girl in remission after immunotherapy clinical trial

    October 5, 2016

    8-year-old Ava Christianson’s acute lymphoblastic leukemia has relapsed five times. She is currently in remission after participating in a CAR T-cell therapy clinical trial under the care of physician-scientist Dr. Terry Fry of the Pediatric Oncology Branch. Read more...

  • Six-year old Jordan fights thyroid cancer

    September 15, 2016

    Six-year-old Jordan van Tonder is originally from South Africa, but he comes to CCR’s Pediatric Oncology Branch every six months for thyroid cancer treatment. “He’s always excited about something. He is a great kid and makes me smile whenever I see him,” says Dr. John Glod, his physician and the study’s Principal Investigator.  Jordan is participating in a protocol for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b (MEN2B), a rare condition through which he developed thyroid cancer. Read more...

About

The Pediatric Oncology Branch is dedicated to improving outcomes for children and young adults with cancer and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. We conduct translational research that spans basic science to clinical trials. Our clinical studies are performed in an environment that supports our patient’s medical and emotional needs, alongside cutting edge scientific research.

Whether you are a referring physician, family member or patient with childhood cancer or neurofibromatosis, or are interested in training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch, we hope that this website will provide the information you need to access our programs.

Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.Brigitte C. Widemann, MD
Chief, Pediatric Oncology Branch
 
  • Refer a patientRefer a Patient

    Physicians should contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch by calling 301-496-4256  or 1-877-624-4878 (8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday) or email ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov 

  • clinical trialsClinical Trials

    We conduct clinical trials in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric sarcomas, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, malignant melanoma, neurofibromatosis and Phase I trials.

  • pediatric oncology fellowshipFellowship

    The Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship is a joint program of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH and Johns Hopkins University.

  • News

    A novel target for high-risk neuroblastoma has been identified in pre-clinical research.  Learn more...

Referrals

refer a patientReferrals

Physicians, patients, or family members may contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday:

 

 

camp fantasticRelated Links

 

For Patients

Our investigators and physicians realize that many challenges remain in the treatment of childhood cancers and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes but we are committed to improving outcomes for children and young adults with these diseases through cutting-edge basic and clinical research. Patients with cancer, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), NF2 or other diseases under study who are enrolled on Branch clinical trials may receive therapy at the NIH Clinical Center.

Our clinical programs and trials span early treatment studies with new targeted agents including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins, immunotherapy including tumor vaccines, and bone marrow transplantation, to studies aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancers and the conditions that predispose children to cancer. Our multidisciplinary teams specialize in the study and treatment of:

Support Services

The treatment of a childhood cancer presents extraordinary psychological, emotional and social challenges to the entire family. We offer a variety of support services to help patients and their families adapt and mobilize resources during treatment for these diseases. At the heart of these services is the personal commitment of every clinical team member to understand each young patient as a unique individual with specific needs. Team members collaborate with parents at each step in the process to be attentive to the quality of life of all family members, including siblings.  

 

Teams

For Trainees

pob traineesTraining Opportunities

 

Trainees and Featured Alumni

  • James Morrow – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Adrienne Long – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Meera Murgabi – PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jerry Jaboin – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis
  • AeRang Kim – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, George Washington University and Attending Physician at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the Children’s National Medical Center

Our Science

News

Novel target for high-risk neuroblastoma identified in pre-clinical research
 

January 9, 2017

Pre-clinical research by investigators at the Center for Cancer Research have identified a number of novel epigenetic targets for high-risk neuroblastoma and validated a promising new targeted inhibitor in pre-clinical models.  Read more...

 

  • Brigitte Widemann leads early-phase trial that shows drug shrinks NF1 tumors
     

    December 28, 2016

    Brigitte Widemann, Chief of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, led an led an early-phase clinical trial testing the oral drug selumetinib on children with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas. The trial results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Dec. 28, 2016, showed participants of this trial tolerated the drug and most responded with tumor shrinkage.“Some may say that a 20 percent volume reduction is too small to be meaningful, but to me, just stopping the growth of these devastating tumors is an important achievement,” Widemann says. “The difference we see in these patients is truly unprecedented.” Read more...

     

  • Lori Wiener discusses psychosocial impacts of childhood cancersDr. Lori Wiener

    November 14, 2016

    Lori Wiener, co-director of the Behavioral Health Core and head of the Psychosocial Support and Research Program, was quoted in HemOnc Today on the evolution of psychosocial care for cancer patients. She says that providing psychosocial care to patients can help improve their overall care. “We have to communicate information to pediatric patients in a way that is truthful and developmentally appropriate, and we need to be able to include them in medical decision-making in an age-appropriate way,” she says. “Providing family centered care is essential. The diagnosis of cancer in a child is a life-changing event for everyone in the family and attention to ongoing parental and family needs is required for optimal psychosocial care to be provided.”

  • 8-year-old girl in remission after immunotherapy clinical trial

    October 5, 2016

    8-year-old Ava Christianson’s acute lymphoblastic leukemia has relapsed five times. She is currently in remission after participating in a CAR T-cell therapy clinical trial under the care of physician-scientist Dr. Terry Fry of the Pediatric Oncology Branch. Read more...

  • Six-year old Jordan fights thyroid cancer

    September 15, 2016

    Six-year-old Jordan van Tonder is originally from South Africa, but he comes to CCR’s Pediatric Oncology Branch every six months for thyroid cancer treatment. “He’s always excited about something. He is a great kid and makes me smile whenever I see him,” says Dr. John Glod, his physician and the study’s Principal Investigator.  Jordan is participating in a protocol for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b (MEN2B), a rare condition through which he developed thyroid cancer. Read more...