Chief
Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.
Email Address
ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov

Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute

Building 10, Room 1W-3750
Bethesda, MD 20892
301-496-4256

The Pediatric Oncology Branch is dedicated to improving outcomes for children and young adults with cancer and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. We conduct translational research that spans basic science to clinical trials. Our clinical studies are performed in an environment that supports our patient’s medical and emotional needs, alongside cutting edge scientific research.

Whether you are a referring physician, family member or patient with childhood cancer or neurofibromatosis, or are interested in training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch, we hope that this website will provide the information you need to access our programs.

Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.Brigitte C. Widemann, MD
Chief, Pediatric Oncology Branch
 
  • Refer a patientRefer a Patient

    Physicians should contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch by calling 301-496-4256  or 1-877-624-4878 (8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday) or email ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov 

  • clinical trialsClinical Trials

    We conduct clinical trials in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric sarcomas, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, malignant melanoma, neurofibromatosis and Phase I trials.

  • pediatric oncology fellowshipFellowship

    The Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship is a joint program of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH and Johns Hopkins University.

  • News

    CCR hosts 10th Annual GIST Clinic.  Learn more...

Our investigators and physicians realize that many challenges remain in the treatment of childhood cancers and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes but we are committed to improving outcomes for children and young adults with these diseases through cutting-edge basic and clinical research. Patients with cancer, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), NF2 or other diseases under study who are enrolled on Branch clinical trials may receive therapy at the NIH Clinical Center.

Our clinical programs and trials span early treatment studies with new targeted agents including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins, immunotherapy including tumor vaccines, and bone marrow transplantation, to studies aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancers and the conditions that predispose children to cancer. Our multidisciplinary teams specialize in the study and treatment of:

Support Services

The treatment of a childhood cancer presents extraordinary psychological, emotional and social challenges to the entire family. We offer a variety of support services to help patients and their families adapt and mobilize resources during treatment for these diseases. At the heart of these services is the personal commitment of every clinical team member to understand each young patient as a unique individual with specific needs. Team members collaborate with parents at each step in the process to be attentive to the quality of life of all family members, including siblings.  

 

refer a patientReferrals

Physicians, patients, or family members may contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday:

 

 

camp fantasticRelated Links

 

pob traineesTraining Opportunities

 

Trainees and Featured Alumni

  • James Morrow – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Adrienne Long – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Meera Murgabi – PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jerry Jaboin – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis
  • AeRang Kim – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, George Washington University and Attending Physician at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the Children’s National Medical Center

2017 GIST clinic patientsCCR hosts 10th Annual GIST Clinic
 

July 14, 2017

Patients and specialists from around the world gathered for the 10th Annual Pediatric and Wildtype GIST Clinic, which took place Wednesday, July 5 through Friday, July 7, 2017 at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Occurring once a year, the clinic convenes clinicians, research scientists and advocates from across the country to consult with patients who have GIST. Christine Gonzales, a GIST clinic patient from New Mexico, says, “It’s been super amazing because I’ve never talked to a specialist about this cancer.”  Learn more...


  • Not slowing down
     

    May 19, 2017

    Nine and-a-half-year-old Travis Carpenter gets a lot of speeding tickets. (He stresses that “and-a-half” part, too). These speeding tickets don’t come from a law enforcement officer but Jesse, one of his nurses at the NIH Clinical Center. Travis uses a power chair that he’s adorned with racing stickers, and his speeding tickets come from him zooming down the Clinical Center’s hallways, dodging the steady traffic of doctors, nurses, patients and families. He loves all things racing, NASCAR and pit crews. Neurofibromatosis type 1 isn’t slowing him down.  Read more...

  • A conversation with Kristy and JaneKristy and Jane

    May 17, 2017

    Jane has been coming to the NIH Clinical Center for treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) since she was three years old. She is currently enrolled in a trial that tests Selumetinib, a MEK inhibitor, and her tumor is now 30.7 percent smaller than when she first started this trial three years ago. Her diagnosis has changed the lives of her family but has also given them new passions and perseverance.  Read more...

  • 8-year-old girl in remission after immunotherapy clinical trial

    October 5, 2016

    8-year-old Ava Christianson’s acute lymphoblastic leukemia has relapsed five times. She is currently in remission after participating in a CAR T-cell therapy clinical trial under the care of physician-scientist Dr. Terry Fry of the Pediatric Oncology Branch. Read more...

  • Six-year old Jordan fights thyroid cancer

    September 15, 2016

    Six-year-old Jordan van Tonder is originally from South Africa, but he comes to CCR’s Pediatric Oncology Branch every six months for thyroid cancer treatment. “He’s always excited about something. He is a great kid and makes me smile whenever I see him,” says Dr. John Glod, his physician and the study’s Principal Investigator.  Jordan is participating in a protocol for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b (MEN2B), a rare condition through which he developed thyroid cancer. Read more...

About

The Pediatric Oncology Branch is dedicated to improving outcomes for children and young adults with cancer and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. We conduct translational research that spans basic science to clinical trials. Our clinical studies are performed in an environment that supports our patient’s medical and emotional needs, alongside cutting edge scientific research.

Whether you are a referring physician, family member or patient with childhood cancer or neurofibromatosis, or are interested in training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch, we hope that this website will provide the information you need to access our programs.

Brigitte C. Widemann, M.D.Brigitte C. Widemann, MD
Chief, Pediatric Oncology Branch
 
  • Refer a patientRefer a Patient

    Physicians should contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch by calling 301-496-4256  or 1-877-624-4878 (8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday) or email ncipediatrics@mail.nih.gov 

  • clinical trialsClinical Trials

    We conduct clinical trials in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric sarcomas, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, malignant melanoma, neurofibromatosis and Phase I trials.

  • pediatric oncology fellowshipFellowship

    The Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship is a joint program of the Pediatric Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH and Johns Hopkins University.

  • News

    CCR hosts 10th Annual GIST Clinic.  Learn more...

Referrals

refer a patientReferrals

Physicians, patients, or family members may contact the Pediatric Oncology Branch from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday:

 

 

camp fantasticRelated Links

 

For Patients

Our investigators and physicians realize that many challenges remain in the treatment of childhood cancers and genetic tumor predisposition syndromes but we are committed to improving outcomes for children and young adults with these diseases through cutting-edge basic and clinical research. Patients with cancer, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), NF2 or other diseases under study who are enrolled on Branch clinical trials may receive therapy at the NIH Clinical Center.

Our clinical programs and trials span early treatment studies with new targeted agents including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins, immunotherapy including tumor vaccines, and bone marrow transplantation, to studies aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancers and the conditions that predispose children to cancer. Our multidisciplinary teams specialize in the study and treatment of:

Support Services

The treatment of a childhood cancer presents extraordinary psychological, emotional and social challenges to the entire family. We offer a variety of support services to help patients and their families adapt and mobilize resources during treatment for these diseases. At the heart of these services is the personal commitment of every clinical team member to understand each young patient as a unique individual with specific needs. Team members collaborate with parents at each step in the process to be attentive to the quality of life of all family members, including siblings.  

 

Teams

For Trainees

pob traineesTraining Opportunities

 

Trainees and Featured Alumni

  • James Morrow – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Adrienne Long – MD/PhD, Graduate Student
  • Meera Murgabi – PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jerry Jaboin – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis
  • AeRang Kim – MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, George Washington University and Attending Physician at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the Children’s National Medical Center

Our Science

News

2017 GIST clinic patientsCCR hosts 10th Annual GIST Clinic
 

July 14, 2017

Patients and specialists from around the world gathered for the 10th Annual Pediatric and Wildtype GIST Clinic, which took place Wednesday, July 5 through Friday, July 7, 2017 at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Occurring once a year, the clinic convenes clinicians, research scientists and advocates from across the country to consult with patients who have GIST. Christine Gonzales, a GIST clinic patient from New Mexico, says, “It’s been super amazing because I’ve never talked to a specialist about this cancer.”  Learn more...


  • Not slowing down
     

    May 19, 2017

    Nine and-a-half-year-old Travis Carpenter gets a lot of speeding tickets. (He stresses that “and-a-half” part, too). These speeding tickets don’t come from a law enforcement officer but Jesse, one of his nurses at the NIH Clinical Center. Travis uses a power chair that he’s adorned with racing stickers, and his speeding tickets come from him zooming down the Clinical Center’s hallways, dodging the steady traffic of doctors, nurses, patients and families. He loves all things racing, NASCAR and pit crews. Neurofibromatosis type 1 isn’t slowing him down.  Read more...

  • A conversation with Kristy and JaneKristy and Jane

    May 17, 2017

    Jane has been coming to the NIH Clinical Center for treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) since she was three years old. She is currently enrolled in a trial that tests Selumetinib, a MEK inhibitor, and her tumor is now 30.7 percent smaller than when she first started this trial three years ago. Her diagnosis has changed the lives of her family but has also given them new passions and perseverance.  Read more...

  • 8-year-old girl in remission after immunotherapy clinical trial

    October 5, 2016

    8-year-old Ava Christianson’s acute lymphoblastic leukemia has relapsed five times. She is currently in remission after participating in a CAR T-cell therapy clinical trial under the care of physician-scientist Dr. Terry Fry of the Pediatric Oncology Branch. Read more...

  • Six-year old Jordan fights thyroid cancer

    September 15, 2016

    Six-year-old Jordan van Tonder is originally from South Africa, but he comes to CCR’s Pediatric Oncology Branch every six months for thyroid cancer treatment. “He’s always excited about something. He is a great kid and makes me smile whenever I see him,” says Dr. John Glod, his physician and the study’s Principal Investigator.  Jordan is participating in a protocol for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b (MEN2B), a rare condition through which he developed thyroid cancer. Read more...