Laboratory of Cancer Immunometabolism

Acting Chief
Daniel W. McVicar, Ph.D.
Acting Deputy Chief
David A. Wink, Jr., Ph.D.

The Laboratory of Cancer Immunometabolism (LCIM) conducts research at the cellular, molecular, biochemical, and genetic level to unravel the metabolic interplay between host immune cells and developing or advancing cancers.  Research in the Laboratory will address questions relating to the metabolic and biochemical pathways of immune cells and cancers including their crosstalk at the biochemical level.  In addition, work will encompass immunometabolism in the cellular context by addressing the biology of immune cells, including dissection of the numerous complex interactions between the host and developing and/or progressing tumors that form unique, intratumoral or systemic niches (whether anatomical, metabolic or immunological) which ultimately determine disease risk, prognosis, and/or response to conventional or immune-therapeutic efficacy. The LCIM will also establish collaborative initiatives with other NCI Laboratories with expertise in immunology, chemical biology, natural products, cancer biology, structural biology and mouse cancer genetics modeling to facilitate the development of small molecule- or biologics-based therapeutic applications targeted at modification of immune cell or cancer cell metabolic function toward diminution of progression or to facilitate therapeutic efficacy.

The Laboratory is composed of 10 research sections:

- The Molecular Immunology Section (Dr. Steve Anderson) investigates the mechanisms controlling selective gene activation in the immune system.

- The Cytokines and Immunity Section (Dr. Scott Durum) is investigating the role of cytokines such as IL7 in the development of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell lineages and their role in promoting cell survival, terminal differentiation and apoptotic cell death.

- The Inflammation and Tumorigenesis Section (Dr. Yingling Hu) studies the mechanism of skin tumorigenesis, the effect of inflammatory microenvironments on skin tumorigenesis in the absence of IKKalpha, and the role of IKKalpha in the development of lymph cells and organs.

-The Vascular Biology Section (Dr. P. Charles Lin) is investigating the mechanisms that regulate inflammation-mediated vascular formation and function in disease conditions.

- The Leukocyte Signaling Section (Dr. Daniel McVicar) dissects the metabolic underpinning of leukocyte activation and function towards an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the innate immune system’s role in the development of, and subsequent response to, cancer.

- The Computational Structural Biology Section (Dr. Ruth Nussinov) is focusing on the key role and principles of allostery under normal conditions, in disease and in allosteric drug discovery.

- The Cellular Immunology Section (Dr. Joost Oppenheim) is investigating the structure/function roles of cytokines, chemokines and alarmins in inflammation and immunity. The investigators in this section are also studying the immunostimulating antitumor effects of alarmins when used as vaccine adjuvants in conjunction with inhibitors of the immunosuppressive components of the immune response to promote antitumor immunity.

- The Chemoattractant Receptor and Signal Section (Dr. Ji Ming Wang) is engaged in studies on the role of chemoattractant receptors such as FPR and FPRL-1 in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and tumor progression of glioblastomas.

- The Molecular and Chemical Inflammation Section (Dr. David Wink) studies the role of redox biology and metabolism in cancer progression and therapy. Specific areas of focus include how small reactive molecules modulate the metabolic and/or inflammatory processes that promote disease progression, and the identification of new therapeutics for improved outcomes.

- The Cellular and Molecular Immunology Section (Dr. Howard Young) studies the molecular mechanism(s) of cytokine-induced gene expression in leukocytes. A primary focus of research is on IFN-gamma, an important marker of inflammation and the host immune response.

Core Facilities

The LCIM also supervises two core laboratories:

Position Keywords Contact Name Contact E-mail Number of Positions
Postdoctoral Fellow - Immunotherapeutic vaccines

Immunotherapeutic vaccines

Joost Oppenheim

oppenhej@mail.nih.gov

1

About

The Laboratory of Cancer Immunometabolism (LCIM) conducts research at the cellular, molecular, biochemical, and genetic level to unravel the metabolic interplay between host immune cells and developing or advancing cancers.  Research in the Laboratory will address questions relating to the metabolic and biochemical pathways of immune cells and cancers including their crosstalk at the biochemical level.  In addition, work will encompass immunometabolism in the cellular context by addressing the biology of immune cells, including dissection of the numerous complex interactions between the host and developing and/or progressing tumors that form unique, intratumoral or systemic niches (whether anatomical, metabolic or immunological) which ultimately determine disease risk, prognosis, and/or response to conventional or immune-therapeutic efficacy. The LCIM will also establish collaborative initiatives with other NCI Laboratories with expertise in immunology, chemical biology, natural products, cancer biology, structural biology and mouse cancer genetics modeling to facilitate the development of small molecule- or biologics-based therapeutic applications targeted at modification of immune cell or cancer cell metabolic function toward diminution of progression or to facilitate therapeutic efficacy.

The Laboratory is composed of 10 research sections:

- The Molecular Immunology Section (Dr. Steve Anderson) investigates the mechanisms controlling selective gene activation in the immune system.

- The Cytokines and Immunity Section (Dr. Scott Durum) is investigating the role of cytokines such as IL7 in the development of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell lineages and their role in promoting cell survival, terminal differentiation and apoptotic cell death.

- The Inflammation and Tumorigenesis Section (Dr. Yingling Hu) studies the mechanism of skin tumorigenesis, the effect of inflammatory microenvironments on skin tumorigenesis in the absence of IKKalpha, and the role of IKKalpha in the development of lymph cells and organs.

-The Vascular Biology Section (Dr. P. Charles Lin) is investigating the mechanisms that regulate inflammation-mediated vascular formation and function in disease conditions.

- The Leukocyte Signaling Section (Dr. Daniel McVicar) dissects the metabolic underpinning of leukocyte activation and function towards an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the innate immune system’s role in the development of, and subsequent response to, cancer.

- The Computational Structural Biology Section (Dr. Ruth Nussinov) is focusing on the key role and principles of allostery under normal conditions, in disease and in allosteric drug discovery.

- The Cellular Immunology Section (Dr. Joost Oppenheim) is investigating the structure/function roles of cytokines, chemokines and alarmins in inflammation and immunity. The investigators in this section are also studying the immunostimulating antitumor effects of alarmins when used as vaccine adjuvants in conjunction with inhibitors of the immunosuppressive components of the immune response to promote antitumor immunity.

- The Chemoattractant Receptor and Signal Section (Dr. Ji Ming Wang) is engaged in studies on the role of chemoattractant receptors such as FPR and FPRL-1 in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and tumor progression of glioblastomas.

- The Molecular and Chemical Inflammation Section (Dr. David Wink) studies the role of redox biology and metabolism in cancer progression and therapy. Specific areas of focus include how small reactive molecules modulate the metabolic and/or inflammatory processes that promote disease progression, and the identification of new therapeutics for improved outcomes.

- The Cellular and Molecular Immunology Section (Dr. Howard Young) studies the molecular mechanism(s) of cytokine-induced gene expression in leukocytes. A primary focus of research is on IFN-gamma, an important marker of inflammation and the host immune response.

Core Facilities

The LCIM also supervises two core laboratories:

PI & Key Staff

Positions

Position Keywords Contact Name Contact E-mail Number of Positions
Postdoctoral Fellow - Immunotherapeutic vaccines

Immunotherapeutic vaccines

Joost Oppenheim

oppenhej@mail.nih.gov

1

Contact Info

Laboratory of Cancer Immunometabolism
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 560, Room 31-93
Frederick, MD 21702-1201
Ph: 301-846-1323 or 301-496-1450
Fax: 301-846-1673 or 301-496-0734
Program Specialist
301-846-1298
Secretary
301-846-5833