Drug successfully treats WHIM syndrome

Researchers have discovered which genus of human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for warts found in patients with WHIM syndrome, a rare autoimmune disease, and determined the drug plerixafor could successfully treat those patients. Read more...

Registration is now open for The Establishment and Control of Viral Persistence conference

Aug 29, 2018

The HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, is organizing this half-day conference to showcase the latest findings in the broad field of viral persistence. A major barrier to the successful eradication of many viral infections, including HIV, herpes viruses, Ebola virus and others, persistence is governed by a complex web of viral and cellular factors acting at the level of individuals and populations. An in-depth discussion of how viruses persist while hosts resist should lead to new strategies aimed at eliminating viruses entrenched in humans. Read more...

Registration is now open for The Establishment and Control of Viral Persistence conference
prostate cancer foundation

CCR researchers receive Prostate Cancer Foundation’s 2018 Young Investigator Awards

Aug 29, 2018

Jennifer Clare Jones, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Research Physician in the Vaccine Branch, and Scott Wilkinson, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Laboratory of Genitourinary Cancer Pathogenesis, are recipients of the Prostate Cancer Foundation's 2018 Young Investigator Awards. The award recognizes investigators who “demonstrate significant promise for having a long-term and impactful career in the prostate cancer research field”. Read more...

CCR researchers receive Prostate Cancer Foundation’s 2018 Young Investigator Awards
T cell

Essential gene network suggests potential therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

Aug 20, 2018

A new study by Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., has uncovered the critical importance of a complex of proteins, called BATF3 and IRF4, in regulating a pro-growth and survival network in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The results demonstrate that this network can be targeted with a class of drugs known as bromodomain-and-extra-terminal-domain (BET) inhibitors, suggesting a novel potential therapy for ATLL. Read more...

lung cancer cells

Clinical trial tests immunotherapy combination for relapsed small cell lung cancer

Aug 20, 2018

Two anticancer drugs used to treat small cell lung cancer (SCLC) damage the DNA inside cancer cells and block the cells’ ability to grow and multiply, but these responses are usually short lived. A study led by Anish Thomas, M.D., of the Developmental Therapeutics Branch is using these drugs in combination with another drug called M7824 to treat relapsed SCLC. The trial aims to see if the drugs complement each other by helping the immune system kill more SCLC cells. Read more...

Steve Rosenberg

Steve Rosenberg featured in STAT article

Aug 20, 2018

Steve Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of the Surgery Branch, has recently been featured in a STAT article. In the article, Dr. Rosenberg discusses tumor infiltrating lymphcytes (TILs), an immunotherapy comprised of a mix of cells, that target different tumor antigens. He is a pioneer of TIL therapy and has been continuing to improve it over the last 20 years.  Read more...

Steve Rosenberg featured in STAT article
gene therapy

CCR-led research team develops predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma

Aug 20, 2018

Researchers have developed a predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma. The study, authored by scientists from CCR’s new Cancer Data Science Laboratory and their extramural colleagues was published on August 20, 2018, in Nature Medicine, describes a gene expression predictor that can indicate whether melanoma in a specific patient is likely to respond to treatment with a type of immunotherapy known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. Read more...

CCR-led research team develops predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma
Nirali Shah

Nirali Shah featured on NPR “Shots” blog

Aug 16, 2018

Nirali N. Shah, M.D., Associate Research Physician in the Pediatric Oncology Branch,was recently featured in NPR’s “Shots” blog. In the post, Dr. Shah discusses CAR-T therapies, specifically an experimental version designed to reduce the risk of recurrence. Dr. Shah and her team are modifying patients’ own immune cells to recognize and attack two targets in leukemia cells instead of one in hopes of reducing the risk of relapse. Read more...

Nirali Shah featured on NPR “Shots” blog
Stem cell

New findings in Cell Stem Cell focus on Id1 and its effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs)

Aug 16, 2018

Jonathan R. Keller, Ph.D., Senior Investigator in the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, and others recently published findings in Cell Stem Cell focused on Id1, an inhibitor of DNA binding, and its effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are cells that form blood cellular components. These findings may have application for treatments such as bone marrow transplantation.  Read more...

New findings in Cell Stem Cell focus on Id1 and its effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs)
Steve Rosenberg

Steve Rosenberg receives 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research

Aug 15, 2018

Steve Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of the Surgery Branch, will receive the 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research for his pioneering role in the development of immunotherapy to treat cancer. The annual award recognizes “those who have altered the course of medical research.” He will share the honor with fellow immunotherapy researchers James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Carl H. June, M.D. The prize will be awarded during a celebration on September 26 in Albany, New York.  Read more...

Steve Rosenberg receives 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research
lymphoma cells

DNA-damaging drugs show promise in helping treat dogs with lymphoma

Aug 6, 2018

DNA-damaging drugs called TOP1 inhibitors are widely used to treat various cancers, but they have limitations. A clinical trial in dogs with lymphoma suggests that three alternative drug candidates with a similar mechanism may be effective. Read more...

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