New trial evaluates investigational drug for endometrial and breast cancers

A new clinical trial is testing ONC201, an investigational drug that in laboratory studies has been shown to kill breast and endometrial cancer cells most likely by destroying mitochondria within the tumor cells. Mitochondria are the “powerhouse” of the cell, and blocking its activity may kill tumor cells and shrink tumors in human patients. Learn more...

CT scan

Phase II trial suggests new drug can shrink tumors in advanced ovarian cancer

Jan 25, 2018

In an ongoing phase II trial led by Jung-Min Lee, M.D., an Investigator in CCR’s Women’s Malignancies Branch, using the drug prexasertib led to decreases in tumor size in patients with advanced ovarian cancer, known as high-grade serious ovarian carcinoma, who currently have limited treatment options. Read more…

Phase II trial suggests new drug can shrink tumors in advanced ovarian cancer
Eye

Scientists repurpose HPV vaccine technology to fight eye cancer

Jan 24, 2018

Uveal melanoma is a rare eye cancer that affects about 1,600 people in the United States. A study by scientists in the Center for Cancer Research and Aura Biosciences, Cambridge, Mass., published December 14, 2017, in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, provides new hope for the early treatment of uveal melanoma. Read more…

Scientists repurpose HPV vaccine technology to fight eye cancer
Dr. Mark Roschewski

Mark Roschewski discusses significance of early detection in solid tumors with Newsweek

Jan 23, 2018

A recent Newsweek article profiles the capabilities of CancerSEEK, a blood-based cancer detection test that may improve detection of early-stage cancers, including those that are hard to detect. Mark Roschewski, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, offered insight on the value of early detection for patients with solid tumors, such as those of the pancreas. According to Dr. Roschewski, “In solid tumors, earlier detection is actually the key. The earlier that one could detect a patient with a tumor, the more likely that the intervention would succeed because the intervention is surgery.” Read the full article…

doctor shaking male patient hand

Combination therapy for non-small cell lung cancer studied in new clinical trial

Jan 23, 2018

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common type of lung cancer, is slow growing and can affect smokers and non-smokers alike. David S. Schrump, M.D., Surgical Chief of the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch, is leading the NCI’s participation in a multicenter trial of a combination drug therapy in patients with NSCLC. Read more...

Combination therapy for non-small cell lung cancer studied in new clinical trial
Dr. Yves Pommier

Yves Pommier named fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Jan 23, 2018

Yves Pommier, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of the Developmental Therapeutics Branch, was recently elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a fellow honors AAAS members whose efforts to advance science or its applications have distinguished them among their peers and colleagues. The 2017 AAAS Fellows will be recognized on Feb. 17, 2018 at the AAAS annual meeting in Austin, TX. Read more...

Dr. Michael Gottesman

Michael Gottesman honored with Order of the Rising Sun by Japanese Government

Jan 19, 2018

The Government of Japan recently honored Michael Gottesman, M.D., Chief of the Laboratory of Cell Biology, with the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays and Neck Ribbon, for his contributions toward promoting research exchange in the biomedical field between the U.S. and Japan. The Order of the Rising Sun was established in 1875 as the first national decoration awarded by the Japanese government. Read more...

Sue Scott

New NCI video showcases one patient’s clinical-trial journey

Jan 11, 2018

Sue Scott was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2011. When standard treatment failed to eliminate her cancer cells, Scott’s doctor referred her to an immunotherapy clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with Christian Hinrichs, M.D., Investigator and Lasker Scholar in CCR’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch. Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment where the patient’s own immune system is used to fight the cancer. In this video, Sue details her story of survival and experience of taking part in a clinical trial with CCR. Watch the video here.

Natalie Porat-Shliom, Ph.D.

Natalie Porat-Shliom joins CCR as NIH Stadtman Investigator

Jan 8, 2018

Natalie Porat-Shliom, Ph.D. has joined the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch (TGIB) as a Stadtman Tenure Track Investigator. Dr. Porat-Shliom's research focuses on utilizing intravital microscopy for imaging and understanding the biology of human cancer. She will explore how normal and malignant cells metabolically adapt to changes in nutrient supply and energy demand and will address specific questions concerning metabolic heterogeneity under physiological conditions and metastatic disease using both mouse model and human samples. Learn more...

NBC4 logo

NBC4 interviews Foregut Team stomach-removal patient

Jan 4, 2018

The CDH1 gene mutation elevates an individual’s lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer to 60-70 percent. Total gastrectomy, or complete removal of the stomach, is a preventive option for persons with this anomaly. After receiving a positive result for the gene mutation at age 40, David Fogel began researching his options and decided to enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health led by Jeremy Davis, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch. As part of the trial, which aims to study the effects of stomach removal for patients with the CDH1 gene mutation, Fogel had his stomach removed in October 2017. In a recent interview with Washington’s NBC4, Fogel discussed life without a stomach with a fellow Maryland resident who also underwent a total gastrectomy after testing positive for the CDH1 mutation. Watch the video here

Foregut team and patient

Foregut team stomach-removal patient featured in The Washington Post

Jan 4, 2018

Individuals with the CDH1 gene mutation have an increased risk of developing stomach cancer. Over the last two decades, total gastrectomy, or removal of the stomach, has become an extreme preventive option for those with the CDH1 mutation. After testing positive for the mutation at age 40, David Fogel began researching his options and decided to enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health led by Jeremy Davis, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch. As part of the trial, which aims to study the effects of stomach removal for patients with the CDH1 gene mutation, Fogel had his stomach completely removed in October 2017. Now months later, Fogel is in high spirits and has no regrets. Read the full story here.

Pages