RNA Biology Laboratory

Chief
Sandra L. Wolin, M.D., Ph.D.
Deputy Chief
Mikhail Kashlev

The RNA Biology Laboratory was formed in 2016 to enhance RNA research at the NCI. Our mission is to carry out cutting-edge research into the roles of RNAs and RNA-protein complexes in cancer and to foster synergistic interactions and cross-disciplinary collaborations between a wide range of RNA scientists and clinicians. Areas under study include the pathways by which RNAs are synthesized, processed and degraded, the mechanisms by which noncoding RNAs and RNA-protein complexes contribute to cell function and tumor virus replication, the ways in which alterations in RNA metabolism contribute to human cancers, and the development of RNA-based therapies.

Noncoding RNAs & RNPs Section: Dr. Sandra Wolin studies how noncoding RNAs function, how cells recognize and degrade defective noncoding RNAs, and how failure to degrade these RNAs affects cell function and contributes to human disease.

Molecular Control & Genetics Section: Dr. Donald Court studies transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria and phages, including mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis and ribosomal RNA processing by RNase III.  His lab has also developed a method for genetic engineering in E. coli.  This technique, called recombineering, has been adopted to facilitate genetic engineering in mouse models.

RNA Mediated Gene Regulation Section: Dr. Shuo Gu focuses on mechanisms of RNA interference, the pathways by which microRNAs are synthesized and degraded and the applications of microRNAs in cancer treatment.  Areas of particular interest include the fidelity of microRNA processing and the cellular roles of microRNA modifications.

Transcription Control Section: Dr. Ding Jin focuses on spatial organization of the transcription machinery including RNA polymerase and transcription factors and chromosome territories in response to environmental cues using Escherichia coli as a model system. He also studies transcriptional regulation in Helicobacter pylori and the interactions between this human pathogen and macrophages during infection.

Molecular Mechanisms of Transcription Section: Dr. Mikhail Kashlev studies how RNAs are synthesized. He conducts biochemical and genetic studies of the mechanisms regulating transcription elongation and RNA polymerase fidelity in E. coli, yeast and mammalian cells.  They also investigate the impact of transcription errors in cancer, and study transcription-coupled DNA repair in yeast and mammalian cells.

Theory of biology: Dr. Thomas Schneider uses information theory and bioinformatic approaches to characterize transcription factors, promoters, ribosome binding sites, RNA folding, RNA splicing, and many other biological processes. He invented the sequence logo.

RNA Structure & Design Section: Dr. Bruce Shapiro pursues research in algorithms for RNA secondary and three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction and analysis in order to increase our understanding of RNA structure and function in biological systems. The laboratory also develops strategies for synthesis and delivery of therapeutic RNA and DNA nanoparticles.

Tumor Virus RNA Biology Section: Dr. Zhi-Ming Zheng focuses on the RNA cis-elements and protein-RNA interactions that regulate viral and host gene expression during infection with tumor viruses, including high-risk human papillomaviruses and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

 

Position Contact Name Contact E-mail Contact Phone Research Area Keywords Number of Positions
Tenure Track/Tenure Eligible Investigators Lori Holliday

hollidal@mail.nih.gov

240-760-7754

RNA biology, RNA-binding proteins, noncoding RNAs

Multiple Positions Available
Postdoctoral Fellow Sandra Wolin

sandra.wolin@nih.gov

RNA-protein interactions, noncoding RNAs, RNA surveillance

1

Congratulations to our FARE2018 WINNERS – Fellows Award for Research Excellence

Cedric Belair
Research Fellow
 
Lisheng Dai
Visiting Fellow
 
Haibin Liu
Postdoctoral Fellow
 

Dr. SteitzNCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap

The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA Biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. With over 850 registrants, hundreds of extramural and intramural scientists shared their latest research in fields including RNA processing, RNA structure, non-coding RNAs and RNA therapy. 

The meeting started with an introduction from the CCR Director, Tom Misteli, Ph.D., and followed with a keynote presentation from Joan Steitz, Ph.D., from Yale University. She reminded the audience of the vast array of RNAs that do not encode proteins but perform other important functions inside cells. Learn more about this symposium...

 

About

The RNA Biology Laboratory was formed in 2016 to enhance RNA research at the NCI. Our mission is to carry out cutting-edge research into the roles of RNAs and RNA-protein complexes in cancer and to foster synergistic interactions and cross-disciplinary collaborations between a wide range of RNA scientists and clinicians. Areas under study include the pathways by which RNAs are synthesized, processed and degraded, the mechanisms by which noncoding RNAs and RNA-protein complexes contribute to cell function and tumor virus replication, the ways in which alterations in RNA metabolism contribute to human cancers, and the development of RNA-based therapies.

Noncoding RNAs & RNPs Section: Dr. Sandra Wolin studies how noncoding RNAs function, how cells recognize and degrade defective noncoding RNAs, and how failure to degrade these RNAs affects cell function and contributes to human disease.

Molecular Control & Genetics Section: Dr. Donald Court studies transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria and phages, including mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis and ribosomal RNA processing by RNase III.  His lab has also developed a method for genetic engineering in E. coli.  This technique, called recombineering, has been adopted to facilitate genetic engineering in mouse models.

RNA Mediated Gene Regulation Section: Dr. Shuo Gu focuses on mechanisms of RNA interference, the pathways by which microRNAs are synthesized and degraded and the applications of microRNAs in cancer treatment.  Areas of particular interest include the fidelity of microRNA processing and the cellular roles of microRNA modifications.

Transcription Control Section: Dr. Ding Jin focuses on spatial organization of the transcription machinery including RNA polymerase and transcription factors and chromosome territories in response to environmental cues using Escherichia coli as a model system. He also studies transcriptional regulation in Helicobacter pylori and the interactions between this human pathogen and macrophages during infection.

Molecular Mechanisms of Transcription Section: Dr. Mikhail Kashlev studies how RNAs are synthesized. He conducts biochemical and genetic studies of the mechanisms regulating transcription elongation and RNA polymerase fidelity in E. coli, yeast and mammalian cells.  They also investigate the impact of transcription errors in cancer, and study transcription-coupled DNA repair in yeast and mammalian cells.

Theory of biology: Dr. Thomas Schneider uses information theory and bioinformatic approaches to characterize transcription factors, promoters, ribosome binding sites, RNA folding, RNA splicing, and many other biological processes. He invented the sequence logo.

RNA Structure & Design Section: Dr. Bruce Shapiro pursues research in algorithms for RNA secondary and three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction and analysis in order to increase our understanding of RNA structure and function in biological systems. The laboratory also develops strategies for synthesis and delivery of therapeutic RNA and DNA nanoparticles.

Tumor Virus RNA Biology Section: Dr. Zhi-Ming Zheng focuses on the RNA cis-elements and protein-RNA interactions that regulate viral and host gene expression during infection with tumor viruses, including high-risk human papillomaviruses and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

 

PI & Key Staff

Positions

Position Contact Name Contact E-mail Contact Phone Research Area Keywords Number of Positions
Tenure Track/Tenure Eligible Investigators Lori Holliday

hollidal@mail.nih.gov

240-760-7754

RNA biology, RNA-binding proteins, noncoding RNAs

Multiple Positions Available
Postdoctoral Fellow Sandra Wolin

sandra.wolin@nih.gov

RNA-protein interactions, noncoding RNAs, RNA surveillance

1

Contact Info

RNA Biology Laboratory
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 560, Room 21-105A
Frederick, MD 21702-1201
Ph: 301-846-1225
Administrative Lab Manager
301-846-1225
Secretary
301-846-5142