Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology

Chief
Jeffrey Schlom, Ph.D.

Mission

The Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology (LTIB) functions as a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary translational research programmatic effort with the goal of developing novel immunotherapies for cancer. The LTIB strategic plan focuses on the development of novel immunotherapeutics, not only as monotherapies, but more importantly, in combination with other immune-mediating modalities, and other conventional or experimental therapies, as part of an immuno-oncology programmatic effort. Within this effort are several research groups and a clinical trials group, and multiple collaborations with intramural and extramural scientific and clinical investigators, and with investigators in the private sector.

Organization

Office of the Chief:  Dr. Jeffrey Schlom (Senior Investigator, Laboratory Chief). This office is responsible for the administrative functions of the LTIB, such as travel, personnel actions, training, meetings, manuscript editing, purchasing, etc.

Immunoregulation Group:  Dr. Claudia Palena (Senior Investigator, Section Head). This group investigates mechanisms of tumor progression, including mechanisms of metastasis and tumor resistance to therapies, and how immune-based therapies can be employed as therapeutics directed against such tumor-cell phenotypes. These studies have led to the identification and analyses of transcription factors that are drivers of the phenomenon of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to ongoing clinical studies employing vaccines directed against one of these gene products.

Recombinant Vaccine Group:  Dr. James Hodge (Senior Investigator, Section Head). This group investigates how non-immune-based therapies affect tumor cells and specific components of the immune system. An emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of how standard-of-care and new experimental therapies alter tumor cells to render them more susceptible to immune-based therapies. These studies form the rationale for novel immune- and non-immune-based combination clinical trials.

Immunomodulation Group: Dr. Sofia Gameiro (Staff Scientist, Group Head). This group examines how emerging therapeutics can modulate the immune system to exert potent antitumor activity, with particular emphasis on how the mechanisms involved can be exploited to maximize antitumor activity in combination regimens with novel immunotherapies and other anticancer modalities. These studies form the rationale for novel hypothesis-driven clinical interventions.

Cytokine Group:  Dr. John Greiner (Staff Scientist, Group Head). This group investigates the mechanisms by which cytokines and other immune modulators affect the host immune system and the tumor microenvironment for use in combination with immunotherapeutics and other forms of cancer therapy.

Cellular Immunology Group:  Dr. Caroline Jochems (Clinical Trials Specialist, Group Head). This group is involved in studies to identify and modify tumor-associated antigens to enhance their immunogenicity in cancer patients in vaccine-mediated immunotherapy. The group also studies patients' immune responses to provide critical information toward the development of more effective immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer.

Molecular Immunology Group:  Dr. Renee Donahue (Staff Scientist, Group Head). In this group emphasis is placed on the identification of specific immune cell subsets that can help identify cancer patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This group also studies the tumor microenvironment and specific immune cell subsets in the periphery, pre- and post-immunotherapy, to identify potential correlations with clinical responses of patients treated with immunotherapies as monotherapy or combination therapy.

Immunotherapeutics Group:  Dr. Duane Hamilton (Staff Scientist, Group Head). This group focuses on the identification and characterization of tumor-specific antigens and neoepitopes. This group evaluates techniques to identify tumor antigens unique to a patient’s own tumor. It is this group's belief that vaccinating patients with neoepitopes uniquely expressed by their tumor will improve the breadth of anti-tumor immunity generated by the lab's vaccine platforms, and result in greater immunological control of tumor growth.

Clinical Trials Group: Dr. Julius Strauss (Assistant Research Physician, Co-Director) and Dr. Margaret Gatti-Mays (Assistant Research Physician, Co-Director). This group designs and conducts science-driven clinical studies as a consequence of hypothesis-driven preclinical studies in the laboratory. Drs. Strauss and Gatti-Mays work closely with Drs. James Gulley and Ravi Madan (Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, each of whom has a joint appointment in the LTIB), and Marijo Bilusic (Genitourinary Malignancies Branch), and with Dr. Schlom and other LTIB staff members as a well-integrated immunotherapy team. This group also serves as the conduit for collaborative trials with clinical investigators in other NCI Branches and at numerous extramural Cancer Centers.

STRATEGIC PLAN

The LTIB program takes advantage of the uniqueness of the NCI intramural program in that it spans high-risk basic discovery research in immunology and tumor biology, through preclinical translational research, to paradigm-shifting clinical trials. Focus is placed on the design and development of novel 'off-the-shelf' recombinant immunotherapeutics and immunomodulators that can be used in clinical studies at numerous institutions, and do not involve costly and labor-intensive ex vivo manipulations that can be carried out in only one or two centers. This is accomplished in part via Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with partners in the private sector. The immunotherapeutics and immune modulators that we have developed have also enabled multiple collaborations with clinical investigators at extramural Cancer Centers.

While the use of checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies (MAb) has shown clear clinical benefit in patients with melanoma, and some other malignancies, in the vast majority of solid tumors <20% of patients benefit from this class of therapies. The LTIB has been and is involved in the design and development of a spectrum of immunotherapeutic and immunomodulatory agents. Preclinical studies have been completed or are ongoing with a range of agents, and clinical studies using many of these agents as monotherapies or in combination therapies are either completed, ongoing or planned to begin shortly.

The preclinical and clinical immunotherapy studies employing a spectrum of different immunotherapeutic agents including vaccines, checkpoint inhibitors, immune modulators, and inhibitors of immune suppressive entities have the potential to convert tumors that currently do not respond to checkpoint inhibition monotherapy (so-called “cold tumors”) into permissive immunogenic targets leading to clinical benefit in patients with multiple types of tumors. A major emphasis of these studies is to also better understand the mechanisms of both host immune cell activation and resistance of tumors to immunotherapeutic approaches, both within the tumor microenvironment and in the peripheral immunome. It may also define which patients will respond to combination immunotherapies when interrogated either (a) prior to the initiation of treatment or (b) early in the therapeutic regimen. These studies may also define which patients will most likely develop autoimmune events when the peripheral immunome is interrogated either prior to the initiation of therapy or early in the therapeutic regimen.

Agents under preclinical and clinical investigation as monotherapy or in combination therapies are:

  • Recombinant vaccines: (a) Poxviral vectors expressing three costimulatory molecules and expressing transgenes for either PSA, CEA plus MUC1, or brachyury. The transcription factor brachyury has been identified as a driver of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, stemness, and resistance to therapy. (b) Admixtures of proprietary recombinant adenovirus vectors containing transgenes for brachyury, CEA, MUC1, PSA, and tumor neoepitopes.
  • Checkpoint inhibitors: (a) anti-PDL1 (avelumab) and (b) anti-PDL1/TGF-betaR2 (TRAP).
  • Immune enhancers: (a) IL-15/Ra/Fc immunocytokine (Alt-803), (b) tumor targeting IL-12 immunocytokine (NHS-IL12), and (c) IDO inhibitor.
  • Costimulators: agonist antibodies to OX40, 41BB, and GITR.
  • Inhibitors of immune suppressive entities: (a) anti-IL8 MAb, (b) small molecule IL-8 inhibitor (IL-8 receptor antagonist), and (c) anti-PDL1/TGF-betaR2 (TRAP).

Clinical trials recently completed or ongoing involving LTIB activities:

The major goals of these studies are (a) to conduct science-driven clinical studies of specific immunotherapeutics based on hypothesis-generated preclinical experimentation, and (b) to conduct "proof of concept" clinical studies employing specific immunotherapeutics as part of an immuno-oncology platform. There are four major components to LTIB clinical trials: (a) preclinical studies providing the rationale, (b) preparation of INDs and protocols, etc., and appropriate reviews, (c) the clinical trials, and (d) analyses of patients' immune responses and clinical correlates. Collaborative clinical studies are also ongoing with clinical investigators in the LTIB and in several other Branches of the Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and with clinicians at several extramural Cancer Centers.

  • A Phase I, Open-Label, Multiple-Ascending Dose Trial to Investigate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Biological and Clinical Activity of Avelumab (MSB0010718C), a Monoclonal anti-PD-L1 Antibody, in Subjects with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors and Expansion to Selected Indications
  • An Open-Label Phase I Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)-based Vaccine Modified to Express Brachyury and T-Cell Costimulatory Molecules (MVA-brachyury-TRICOM)

  • A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 2 Trial of GI-6301 (Yeast-Brachyury Vaccine) Versus Placebo in Combination with Standard of Care Definitive Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced, Unresectable, Chordoma

  • A Phase 2 study of GI-6207 (yeast-CEA vaccine) in Patients with Recurrent Medullary Thyroid Cancer

  • A Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant rFowlpox-PSA (L155)-TRICOM (Prostvac-F/TRICOM) in Combination with Vaccinia-PSA (L155)-TRICOM (Prostvac-V/TRICOM) in Men With Prostate Cancer Undergoing Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy

  • A Phase I, Open-Label, Multiple-Ascending Dose Trial to Investigate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Biological and Clinical Activity of MSB0011359C (TGFβ TRAP) in Subjects with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors with Expansion to Selected Indications

  • Phase II Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of PROSTVAC (PSA-TRICOM) in Patients with Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Active Surveillance

  • Docetaxel and PROSTVAC for Metastatic Castration Sensitive Prostate Cancer

  • Phase I Study of PROSTVAC in Combination with Nivolumab and/or Ipilimumab in Men with PC. PIN study.

  • A Phase Ib Open Label, Dose Finding Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Avelumab in Combination with M9241 (NHS-IL12) in Subjects with Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Solid Tumors

  • A Randomized Phase II trial of Standard of Care Alone or in Combination with Ad-CEA vaccine and Avelumab in Patients with Previously Untreated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Recent Selected Publications:

  • Jochems C...Gulley JL, Schlom J. Analyses of functions of an anti-PD-L1/TGFβR2 bispecific fusion protein (M7824). Oncotarget. 8:75217-31, 2017.
  • Knudson KM...Gameiro SR, Schlom J. M7824, a novel bifunctional anti-PD-L1/TGFβ Trap fusion protein, promotes anti-tumor efficacy as monotherapy and in combination with vaccine. OncoImmunology. 7:5,2018.
  • Strauss J..Schlom J...Gulley JL. Phase 1 trial of M7824 (MSB0011359C), a bifunctional fusion protein targeting PD-L1 and TGF-β, in advanced solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res. 24(6):1287-95, 2018.
  • Heery CR...Gulley JL, Schlom J. Phase I study of a poxviral TRICOM-based vaccine directed against the transcription factor brachyury. Clin Cancer Res. 23:6833-45,  2017.
  • David JM...Schlom J, Palena C. A novel bifunctional anti-PD-L1/TGF-β Trap fusion protein (M7824) efficiently reverts mesenchymalization of human lung cancer cells. OncoImmunology. 6(10):e1349589, 2017.
  • Tsang KY...Schlom J. Identification and characterization of enhancer agonist human cytotoxic T-cell epitopes of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6/E7. Vaccine. 35:2605-11, 2017.
  • Jochems C...Schlom J. An NK cell line (haNK) expressing high levels of granzyme and engineered to express the high affinity CD16 allele. Oncotarget. 7(52):86359-86373, 2016.
  • Fallon JK…Greiner JW, Schlom J. Enhanced antitumor effects by combining an IL-12/anti-DNA fusion protein with avelumab, an anti-PD-L1 antibody. Oncotarget. 8:20558-71, 2017.
  • Donahue RN...Gulley JL, Schlom J. Analyses of the peripheral immunome following multiple administrations of avelumab, a human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody. J ImmunoTher Cancer 5:20, 2017.
  • Heery CR…Schlom J, Gulley JL. Avelumab for metastatic or locally advanced previously treated solid tumours (JAVELIN Solid Tumor): a phase 1a, multicohort, dose-escalation trial. Lancet Oncol. 18:587-98, 2017.
  • Jochems C...Schlom J. An NK cell line (haNK) expressing high levels of granzyme and engineered to express the high affinity CD16 allele. Oncotarget 7:86359-73, 2016.
  • Farsaci B… Gulley JL, Schlom J. Analyses of pre-therapy peripheral immunoscore and response to vaccine therapy. Cancer Immunol Res. 4:755-65, 2016.
  • Vandeveer AJ…Greiner JW, Schlom J. Systemic immunotherapy of non–muscle invasive mouse bladder cancer with avelumab, an anti–PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor. Cancer Immunol Res. 4:452-62, 2016.
  • Kim PS…Hodge JW, Schlom J. IL-15 superagonist/IL-15RαSushi-Fc fusion complex (IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc; ALT-803) markedly enhances specific subpopulations of NK and memory CD8+ T cells, and mediates potent anti-tumor activity against murine breast and colon carcinomas. Oncotarget. 7:16130-45, 2016.

 

Position Contact Name Contact E-mail Contact Phone Research Area Keywords Number of Positions
Postdoctoral Fellows Jeffrey Schlom js141c@nih.gov 240-858-3463

immunology, immunotherapy, experimental pathology

Multiple Positions Available

About

Mission

The Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology (LTIB) functions as a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary translational research programmatic effort with the goal of developing novel immunotherapies for cancer. The LTIB strategic plan focuses on the development of novel immunotherapeutics, not only as monotherapies, but more importantly, in combination with other immune-mediating modalities, and other conventional or experimental therapies, as part of an immuno-oncology programmatic effort. Within this effort are several research groups and a clinical trials group, and multiple collaborations with intramural and extramural scientific and clinical investigators, and with investigators in the private sector.

Organization

Office of the Chief:  Dr. Jeffrey Schlom (Senior Investigator, Laboratory Chief). This office is responsible for the administrative functions of the LTIB, such as travel, personnel actions, training, meetings, manuscript editing, purchasing, etc.

Immunoregulation Group:  Dr. Claudia Palena (Senior Investigator, Section Head). This group investigates mechanisms of tumor progression, including mechanisms of metastasis and tumor resistance to therapies, and how immune-based therapies can be employed as therapeutics directed against such tumor-cell phenotypes. These studies have led to the identification and analyses of transcription factors that are drivers of the phenomenon of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to ongoing clinical studies employing vaccines directed against one of these gene products.

Recombinant Vaccine Group:  Dr. James Hodge (Senior Investigator, Section Head). This group investigates how non-immune-based therapies affect tumor cells and specific components of the immune system. An emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of how standard-of-care and new experimental therapies alter tumor cells to render them more susceptible to immune-based therapies. These studies form the rationale for novel immune- and non-immune-based combination clinical trials.

Immunomodulation Group: Dr. Sofia Gameiro (Staff Scientist, Group Head). This group examines how emerging therapeutics can modulate the immune system to exert potent antitumor activity, with particular emphasis on how the mechanisms involved can be exploited to maximize antitumor activity in combination regimens with novel immunotherapies and other anticancer modalities. These studies form the rationale for novel hypothesis-driven clinical interventions.

Cytokine Group:  Dr. John Greiner (Staff Scientist, Group Head). This group investigates the mechanisms by which cytokines and other immune modulators affect the host immune system and the tumor microenvironment for use in combination with immunotherapeutics and other forms of cancer therapy.

Cellular Immunology Group:  Dr. Caroline Jochems (Clinical Trials Specialist, Group Head). This group is involved in studies to identify and modify tumor-associated antigens to enhance their immunogenicity in cancer patients in vaccine-mediated immunotherapy. The group also studies patients' immune responses to provide critical information toward the development of more effective immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer.

Molecular Immunology Group:  Dr. Renee Donahue (Staff Scientist, Group Head). In this group emphasis is placed on the identification of specific immune cell subsets that can help identify cancer patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This group also studies the tumor microenvironment and specific immune cell subsets in the periphery, pre- and post-immunotherapy, to identify potential correlations with clinical responses of patients treated with immunotherapies as monotherapy or combination therapy.

Immunotherapeutics Group:  Dr. Duane Hamilton (Staff Scientist, Group Head). This group focuses on the identification and characterization of tumor-specific antigens and neoepitopes. This group evaluates techniques to identify tumor antigens unique to a patient’s own tumor. It is this group's belief that vaccinating patients with neoepitopes uniquely expressed by their tumor will improve the breadth of anti-tumor immunity generated by the lab's vaccine platforms, and result in greater immunological control of tumor growth.

Clinical Trials Group: Dr. Julius Strauss (Assistant Research Physician, Co-Director) and Dr. Margaret Gatti-Mays (Assistant Research Physician, Co-Director). This group designs and conducts science-driven clinical studies as a consequence of hypothesis-driven preclinical studies in the laboratory. Drs. Strauss and Gatti-Mays work closely with Drs. James Gulley and Ravi Madan (Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, each of whom has a joint appointment in the LTIB), and Marijo Bilusic (Genitourinary Malignancies Branch), and with Dr. Schlom and other LTIB staff members as a well-integrated immunotherapy team. This group also serves as the conduit for collaborative trials with clinical investigators in other NCI Branches and at numerous extramural Cancer Centers.

STRATEGIC PLAN

The LTIB program takes advantage of the uniqueness of the NCI intramural program in that it spans high-risk basic discovery research in immunology and tumor biology, through preclinical translational research, to paradigm-shifting clinical trials. Focus is placed on the design and development of novel 'off-the-shelf' recombinant immunotherapeutics and immunomodulators that can be used in clinical studies at numerous institutions, and do not involve costly and labor-intensive ex vivo manipulations that can be carried out in only one or two centers. This is accomplished in part via Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with partners in the private sector. The immunotherapeutics and immune modulators that we have developed have also enabled multiple collaborations with clinical investigators at extramural Cancer Centers.

While the use of checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies (MAb) has shown clear clinical benefit in patients with melanoma, and some other malignancies, in the vast majority of solid tumors <20% of patients benefit from this class of therapies. The LTIB has been and is involved in the design and development of a spectrum of immunotherapeutic and immunomodulatory agents. Preclinical studies have been completed or are ongoing with a range of agents, and clinical studies using many of these agents as monotherapies or in combination therapies are either completed, ongoing or planned to begin shortly.

The preclinical and clinical immunotherapy studies employing a spectrum of different immunotherapeutic agents including vaccines, checkpoint inhibitors, immune modulators, and inhibitors of immune suppressive entities have the potential to convert tumors that currently do not respond to checkpoint inhibition monotherapy (so-called “cold tumors”) into permissive immunogenic targets leading to clinical benefit in patients with multiple types of tumors. A major emphasis of these studies is to also better understand the mechanisms of both host immune cell activation and resistance of tumors to immunotherapeutic approaches, both within the tumor microenvironment and in the peripheral immunome. It may also define which patients will respond to combination immunotherapies when interrogated either (a) prior to the initiation of treatment or (b) early in the therapeutic regimen. These studies may also define which patients will most likely develop autoimmune events when the peripheral immunome is interrogated either prior to the initiation of therapy or early in the therapeutic regimen.

Agents under preclinical and clinical investigation as monotherapy or in combination therapies are:

  • Recombinant vaccines: (a) Poxviral vectors expressing three costimulatory molecules and expressing transgenes for either PSA, CEA plus MUC1, or brachyury. The transcription factor brachyury has been identified as a driver of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, stemness, and resistance to therapy. (b) Admixtures of proprietary recombinant adenovirus vectors containing transgenes for brachyury, CEA, MUC1, PSA, and tumor neoepitopes.
  • Checkpoint inhibitors: (a) anti-PDL1 (avelumab) and (b) anti-PDL1/TGF-betaR2 (TRAP).
  • Immune enhancers: (a) IL-15/Ra/Fc immunocytokine (Alt-803), (b) tumor targeting IL-12 immunocytokine (NHS-IL12), and (c) IDO inhibitor.
  • Costimulators: agonist antibodies to OX40, 41BB, and GITR.
  • Inhibitors of immune suppressive entities: (a) anti-IL8 MAb, (b) small molecule IL-8 inhibitor (IL-8 receptor antagonist), and (c) anti-PDL1/TGF-betaR2 (TRAP).

Clinical trials recently completed or ongoing involving LTIB activities:

The major goals of these studies are (a) to conduct science-driven clinical studies of specific immunotherapeutics based on hypothesis-generated preclinical experimentation, and (b) to conduct "proof of concept" clinical studies employing specific immunotherapeutics as part of an immuno-oncology platform. There are four major components to LTIB clinical trials: (a) preclinical studies providing the rationale, (b) preparation of INDs and protocols, etc., and appropriate reviews, (c) the clinical trials, and (d) analyses of patients' immune responses and clinical correlates. Collaborative clinical studies are also ongoing with clinical investigators in the LTIB and in several other Branches of the Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and with clinicians at several extramural Cancer Centers.

  • A Phase I, Open-Label, Multiple-Ascending Dose Trial to Investigate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Biological and Clinical Activity of Avelumab (MSB0010718C), a Monoclonal anti-PD-L1 Antibody, in Subjects with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors and Expansion to Selected Indications
  • An Open-Label Phase I Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)-based Vaccine Modified to Express Brachyury and T-Cell Costimulatory Molecules (MVA-brachyury-TRICOM)

  • A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 2 Trial of GI-6301 (Yeast-Brachyury Vaccine) Versus Placebo in Combination with Standard of Care Definitive Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced, Unresectable, Chordoma

  • A Phase 2 study of GI-6207 (yeast-CEA vaccine) in Patients with Recurrent Medullary Thyroid Cancer

  • A Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant rFowlpox-PSA (L155)-TRICOM (Prostvac-F/TRICOM) in Combination with Vaccinia-PSA (L155)-TRICOM (Prostvac-V/TRICOM) in Men With Prostate Cancer Undergoing Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy

  • A Phase I, Open-Label, Multiple-Ascending Dose Trial to Investigate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Biological and Clinical Activity of MSB0011359C (TGFβ TRAP) in Subjects with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors with Expansion to Selected Indications

  • Phase II Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of PROSTVAC (PSA-TRICOM) in Patients with Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Active Surveillance

  • Docetaxel and PROSTVAC for Metastatic Castration Sensitive Prostate Cancer

  • Phase I Study of PROSTVAC in Combination with Nivolumab and/or Ipilimumab in Men with PC. PIN study.

  • A Phase Ib Open Label, Dose Finding Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Avelumab in Combination with M9241 (NHS-IL12) in Subjects with Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Solid Tumors

  • A Randomized Phase II trial of Standard of Care Alone or in Combination with Ad-CEA vaccine and Avelumab in Patients with Previously Untreated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Recent Selected Publications:

  • Jochems C...Gulley JL, Schlom J. Analyses of functions of an anti-PD-L1/TGFβR2 bispecific fusion protein (M7824). Oncotarget. 8:75217-31, 2017.
  • Knudson KM...Gameiro SR, Schlom J. M7824, a novel bifunctional anti-PD-L1/TGFβ Trap fusion protein, promotes anti-tumor efficacy as monotherapy and in combination with vaccine. OncoImmunology. 7:5,2018.
  • Strauss J..Schlom J...Gulley JL. Phase 1 trial of M7824 (MSB0011359C), a bifunctional fusion protein targeting PD-L1 and TGF-β, in advanced solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res. 24(6):1287-95, 2018.
  • Heery CR...Gulley JL, Schlom J. Phase I study of a poxviral TRICOM-based vaccine directed against the transcription factor brachyury. Clin Cancer Res. 23:6833-45,  2017.
  • David JM...Schlom J, Palena C. A novel bifunctional anti-PD-L1/TGF-β Trap fusion protein (M7824) efficiently reverts mesenchymalization of human lung cancer cells. OncoImmunology. 6(10):e1349589, 2017.
  • Tsang KY...Schlom J. Identification and characterization of enhancer agonist human cytotoxic T-cell epitopes of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6/E7. Vaccine. 35:2605-11, 2017.
  • Jochems C...Schlom J. An NK cell line (haNK) expressing high levels of granzyme and engineered to express the high affinity CD16 allele. Oncotarget. 7(52):86359-86373, 2016.
  • Fallon JK…Greiner JW, Schlom J. Enhanced antitumor effects by combining an IL-12/anti-DNA fusion protein with avelumab, an anti-PD-L1 antibody. Oncotarget. 8:20558-71, 2017.
  • Donahue RN...Gulley JL, Schlom J. Analyses of the peripheral immunome following multiple administrations of avelumab, a human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody. J ImmunoTher Cancer 5:20, 2017.
  • Heery CR…Schlom J, Gulley JL. Avelumab for metastatic or locally advanced previously treated solid tumours (JAVELIN Solid Tumor): a phase 1a, multicohort, dose-escalation trial. Lancet Oncol. 18:587-98, 2017.
  • Jochems C...Schlom J. An NK cell line (haNK) expressing high levels of granzyme and engineered to express the high affinity CD16 allele. Oncotarget 7:86359-73, 2016.
  • Farsaci B… Gulley JL, Schlom J. Analyses of pre-therapy peripheral immunoscore and response to vaccine therapy. Cancer Immunol Res. 4:755-65, 2016.
  • Vandeveer AJ…Greiner JW, Schlom J. Systemic immunotherapy of non–muscle invasive mouse bladder cancer with avelumab, an anti–PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor. Cancer Immunol Res. 4:452-62, 2016.
  • Kim PS…Hodge JW, Schlom J. IL-15 superagonist/IL-15RαSushi-Fc fusion complex (IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc; ALT-803) markedly enhances specific subpopulations of NK and memory CD8+ T cells, and mediates potent anti-tumor activity against murine breast and colon carcinomas. Oncotarget. 7:16130-45, 2016.

 

Clinical Trials

PI & Key Staff

Positions

Position Contact Name Contact E-mail Contact Phone Research Area Keywords Number of Positions
Postdoctoral Fellows Jeffrey Schlom js141c@nih.gov 240-858-3463

immunology, immunotherapy, experimental pathology

Multiple Positions Available

Contact Info

Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 10, Room 8B09
Bethesda, MD 20892-1750
Ph: 240-858-3463
Fax: 240-541-4558
Editor
240-858-3464
Program Manager
240-858-3462
Program Specialist
240-858-3459