doctor shaking male patient hand

Combination therapy for non-small cell lung cancer studied in new clinical trial

Jan 23, 2018

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common type of lung cancer, is slow growing and can affect smokers and non-smokers alike. David S. Schrump, M.D., Surgical Chief of the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch, is leading the NCI’s participation in a multicenter trial of a combination drug therapy in patients with NSCLC. Read more...

Sue Scott

New NCI video showcases one patient’s clinical-trial journey

Jan 11, 2018

Sue Scott was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2011. When standard treatment failed to eliminate her cancer cells, Scott’s doctor referred her to an immunotherapy clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with Christian Hinrichs, M.D., Investigator and Lasker Scholar in CCR’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch. Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment where the patient’s own immune system is used to fight the cancer. In this video, Sue details her story of survival and experience of taking part in a clinical trial with CCR. Watch the video here.

New NCI video showcases one patient’s clinical-trial journey
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NBC4 interviews Foregut Team stomach-removal patient

Jan 4, 2018

The CDH1 gene mutation elevates an individual’s lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer to 60-70 percent. Total gastrectomy, or complete removal of the stomach, is a preventive option for persons with this anomaly. After receiving a positive result for the gene mutation at age 40, David Fogel began researching his options and decided to enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health led by Jeremy Davis, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch. As part of the trial, which aims to study the effects of stomach removal for patients with the CDH1 gene mutation, Fogel had his stomach removed in October 2017. In a recent interview with Washington’s NBC4, Fogel discussed life without a stomach with a fellow Maryland resident who also underwent a total gastrectomy after testing positive for the CDH1 mutation. Watch the video here

NBC4 interviews Foregut Team stomach-removal patient
Foregut team and patient

Foregut team stomach-removal patient featured in The Washington Post

Jan 4, 2018

Individuals with the CDH1 gene mutation have an increased risk of developing stomach cancer. Over the last two decades, total gastrectomy, or removal of the stomach, has become an extreme preventive option for those with the CDH1 mutation. After testing positive for the mutation at age 40, David Fogel began researching his options and decided to enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health led by Jeremy Davis, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch. As part of the trial, which aims to study the effects of stomach removal for patients with the CDH1 gene mutation, Fogel had his stomach completely removed in October 2017. Now months later, Fogel is in high spirits and has no regrets. Read the full story here.

Foregut team stomach-removal patient featured in The Washington Post
muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells

New clinical trial open for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer

Dec 20, 2017

Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is an aggressive form of bladder cancer in which the tumor invades deep into the musculature of the bladder wall, making it more likely to spread to other parts of the body. Standard treatment involves cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy, which is surgery to remove the bladder and nearby organs. However, many patients don’t receive chemotherapy before surgery or may not respond to it. Other patients are ineligible for cisplatin treatment due to poor kidney function. CCR investigators are leading a phase III trial to determine whether an immunotherapy drug given shortly after cystectomy can help these patients. Read more…

Mouse bladder

Researchers studying alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients

Dec 11, 2017

A new phase I clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is evaluating the safety and tolerability, or the degree to which any side effects can be tolerated by patients, of a two-drug combination as a potential alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients. The trial targets patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) whose cancers have stopped responding to traditional therapies. Read more...

Prostate cancer

Clinical trial tests precision radiotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

Dec 4, 2017

CCR investigators are leading a trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat localized prostate cancer that has recurred after standard radiation therapy. The technique uses advanced molecular imaging to guide the delivery of high doses of radiation just to tumors that have recurred, potentially leading to fewer side effects. Read more…

Yolland Jackson

Fearless in the face of small cell lung cancer

Nov 21, 2017

Yolland Jackson considers herself a soldier who is determined to fight her small cell lung cancer until the bitter end. In discussing her decision to enroll in a phase II clinical trial led by Investigator Anish Thomas, M.B.B.S., M.D., in the Developmental Therapeutics Branch, she shared some of her reasoning with him. “This is bigger than me. This is happening to me because someone is going to come after me that will need this treatment. Whatever you need to do, I’m in.” Read more…

Doctors with pediatric patient

Pediatric clinical trial studies antibody treatment for various types of solid tumors

Nov 16, 2017

A clinical trial for pediatric patients will test the safety and efficacy of enoblituzumab in solid tumors that express a specific protein, including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Wilms tumor, or desmoplastic small round cell tumor. Read more... 

B-cell lymphoma cells

Clinical trial for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies now recruiting

Nov 14, 2017

B-cell lymphomas are blood cancers that affect B-cells, white blood cells that develop and mature in bone marrow in the core of most bones. Mark Roschewski, M.D., of the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch is leading a study of a new treatment for B-cell lymphomas that have not responded to radiation and chemotherapy. Read more...

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