Laboratory of Genome Integrity

Chief
Andre Nussenzweig, Ph.D.

The research program in the Laboratory of Genome Integrity is focused on the exploration of the causes and effects of genomic instability, mechanisms of DNA repair and the study of DNA repair breakdown as an initiating or protective event in aging and cancers. The program will emphasize a mechanistic understanding of the pathways that maintain genomic integrity, the intersection of these pathways with normal cellular physiology and cancer and the application of these insights to the development of new therapeutic strategies. The laboratory has made major contributions towards a detailed understanding of DNA repair pathway selection as a primary influence on genomic stability and drug resistance/sensitivity in breast and ovarian cancers and the influential role of DNA repair proteins in the promotion of specific hematological malignancies.

The Laboratory is also expanding its efforts in the areas of cellular identity and development by examining the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into early T-cell lineage progenitors. This new program will place particular importance towards a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signals that influence hematopoietic progenitor migration, the transcription factors that positively and negatively impact T-cell lineage selection and the contribution of deregulated normal developmental processes in T-cell aging and cancer. The Laboratory of Genome Integrity also manages a state-of-the-art flow cytometry core that houses four cell sorters, four cell analyzers and serves the scientific needs of over 200 scientists and 80 different principal investigators every year. This facility will continue to provide both routine as well as highly specialized sorting services to members of the CCR-NCI community.

 

                                         The Laboratory of Genome Integrity, July 2019

The Laboratory of Genome Integrity, July 2019

                                               

Position Degree Required Contact Name E-mail Address
Post-doctoral Fellow - DNA damage, DNA repair, genomics Ph.D. or equivalent Sam John sam.john@nih.gov
Post-doctoral Fellow - DNA damage, DNA repair, computational biology, genomics Ph.D. or equivalent Sam John sam.john@nih.gov

LGI Flow Cytometry Core Facility - NIH 37 logo

Flow Cytometry Core

The Flow Cytometry Core in Building 37, overseen by the Laboratory of Genome Integrity (LGI), is under the supervision of Ferenc Livak, MD. Flow Core 37 supports the NCI-CCR scientific research community by providing training, instrumentation, and expertise to perform state-of-the art flow cytometry analysis and cell sorting. Currently, the laboratory houses:
  • 4 cell analyzers: 1 FACS Calibur, 1 FACSCanto, and 2 LSRII Fortessa (up to 18-color analysis)
  • 4 cell sorters:  2 BD FACS Arias, 1 MoFlo Astrios EQ, and 1 BD FACSAria Fusion

The analytical instruments are available to trained users on a 24/7 basis. Cell sorting is mostly performed by staff.

These instruments provide reliable and consistent service to investigators from over 35 NCI laboratories and branches (>80 principal investigators, 200 other investigators).

For information on accessing the LGI Flow Cytometry, please go to https://labshare.nih.gov/nci/CCR-FACS/SitePages/Home.aspx (link is external)

   

Andre Nussenzweig - Wei Yang Virtual Seminar Series

This series is co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). For more information about this seminar series, please contact Sam John at sam@nih.gov 

Past Seminars

Visit our archives to learn more about past seminars.

Upcoming Seminars:  2021

Time and Link (unless otherwise noted):
Please use the Zoom link below.
Time: 11AM EDT
Meeting ID: 161 822 3083
Password: 675056
 
Mon 26-Apr
Speaker: Helle Ulrich, Scientific Director, Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Professor, Faculty of Biology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany
Title: Dealing with DNA damage during replication
 
Mon 3-May
Speaker: Gaelle Legube, Principal Investigator, Chromatin and DNA repair group, CBI (Centre De Biologie Integrative), CNRS- University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France
Title: Chromosome and Chromatin dynamics at DNA Double Strand breaks 
 
Mon 10-May
Speaker: Titia Sixma, Group Leader, Biochemistry Division and Oncode Institute, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Title:  Replication damage: allosteric control of PCNA K164 (de)ubiquitination
 
Mon 17-May
Speaker: Steve Jackson, Professor, Head of Cancer Research UK Laboratories, The Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Title: Cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks: mechanistic insights and clinical applications
 
Mon 24-May
Speaker: Fred Alt, HHMI Investigator, Director, Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Charles A. Janeway Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Title: Chromatin Loop Extrusion Plays  Fundamental Roles in Antibody V(D)J and Class Switch Recombination 
 
Mon 7-June
Speaker: John Stamatoyannopoulos, Department of Genome Sciences and Medicine, University of Washington and Scientific Director, Altius Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Seattle, WA
Title: 'TBA' 
 
Mon 14-June
Speaker: Jean Gautier, Department of Genetics and Development, Institute for Cancer Genetics, Columbia University, New York, NY
Title:  'TBA'
 
Mon 21-June
Speaker: Ludovic Deriano, Head of the Genome Integrity, Immunity and Cancer Unit, Department of Immunology, Department of Genomes and Genetics, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France 
Title:  Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice in recombining B lymphocytes
 
Mon 28-June
Speaker: David Pellman, The Margaret M. Dyson Professor of Pediatric Oncology (DFCI); HHMI Investigator; Professor of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Title: The mechanism of chromothripsis
 
Mon 12-July
Speaker: Steven Artandi, Director of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Title: 'TBA' 
 
Mon 19-July
Speaker: Ian Hickson, Center for Chromosome Stability, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Title: Cellular responses to DNA replication stress
 
Mon 26-July
Speaker: Maria Elena Torres-Padilla, Director of the Institute of Epigenetics and Stem Cells, Helmholtz Zentrum, Munich, Germany 
Title: Epigenetic mechanisms in early mammalian development
 
Mon 30-August
Speaker: Michael Krangel, Department of Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC
Title: 'TBA'
 
Mon 13-September
Speaker: Gary Felsenfeld, NIH Distinguished Investigator, Physical Chemistry Section, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, NIDDK, NIH, Bethesda, MD
Title: 'TBA'
 
Mon 27-September
Speaker: Anjana Rao, Division of Signaling and Gene Expression, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 
Title: 'TBA'
 
Mon 4-October
Speaker: Yamini Dalal, Chromatin Structure and Epigenetic Mechanisms Group, Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD
Title: 'TBA 
 
Mon 25-October
Speaker: Cornelis Murre, Chair of Department of Molecular Biology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA   
Title: 'TBA 

About

The research program in the Laboratory of Genome Integrity is focused on the exploration of the causes and effects of genomic instability, mechanisms of DNA repair and the study of DNA repair breakdown as an initiating or protective event in aging and cancers. The program will emphasize a mechanistic understanding of the pathways that maintain genomic integrity, the intersection of these pathways with normal cellular physiology and cancer and the application of these insights to the development of new therapeutic strategies. The laboratory has made major contributions towards a detailed understanding of DNA repair pathway selection as a primary influence on genomic stability and drug resistance/sensitivity in breast and ovarian cancers and the influential role of DNA repair proteins in the promotion of specific hematological malignancies.

The Laboratory is also expanding its efforts in the areas of cellular identity and development by examining the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into early T-cell lineage progenitors. This new program will place particular importance towards a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signals that influence hematopoietic progenitor migration, the transcription factors that positively and negatively impact T-cell lineage selection and the contribution of deregulated normal developmental processes in T-cell aging and cancer. The Laboratory of Genome Integrity also manages a state-of-the-art flow cytometry core that houses four cell sorters, four cell analyzers and serves the scientific needs of over 200 scientists and 80 different principal investigators every year. This facility will continue to provide both routine as well as highly specialized sorting services to members of the CCR-NCI community.

 

                                         The Laboratory of Genome Integrity, July 2019

The Laboratory of Genome Integrity, July 2019

                                               

PI & Key Staff

Positions

Position Degree Required Contact Name E-mail Address
Post-doctoral Fellow - DNA damage, DNA repair, genomics Ph.D. or equivalent Sam John sam.john@nih.gov
Post-doctoral Fellow - DNA damage, DNA repair, computational biology, genomics Ph.D. or equivalent Sam John sam.john@nih.gov

Cores

LGI Flow Cytometry Core Facility - NIH 37 logo

Flow Cytometry Core

The Flow Cytometry Core in Building 37, overseen by the Laboratory of Genome Integrity (LGI), is under the supervision of Ferenc Livak, MD. Flow Core 37 supports the NCI-CCR scientific research community by providing training, instrumentation, and expertise to perform state-of-the art flow cytometry analysis and cell sorting. Currently, the laboratory houses:
  • 4 cell analyzers: 1 FACS Calibur, 1 FACSCanto, and 2 LSRII Fortessa (up to 18-color analysis)
  • 4 cell sorters:  2 BD FACS Arias, 1 MoFlo Astrios EQ, and 1 BD FACSAria Fusion

The analytical instruments are available to trained users on a 24/7 basis. Cell sorting is mostly performed by staff.

These instruments provide reliable and consistent service to investigators from over 35 NCI laboratories and branches (>80 principal investigators, 200 other investigators).

For information on accessing the LGI Flow Cytometry, please go to https://labshare.nih.gov/nci/CCR-FACS/SitePages/Home.aspx (link is external)

   

Contact Info

Laboratory of Genome Integrity
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 37, Room 1108
Bethesda, MD 20892-4254
Ph: 240-760-7607
Fax: 240-541-4489
Technical Lab Manager
240-760-7601
Administrative Assistant
240-760-6687
Administrative Assistant
240-760-6382