stethoscope

CCR celebrates Doctors Day

Mar 30, 2018

March 30th marks the annual observation of National Doctors Day.  Learn more...

merkel cell carcinoma

International Workshop on Merkel Cell Carcinoma Research (IWMCC) held in early March

Mar 29, 2018

Over 50 global thought-leaders gathered in early March to discuss and identify the most important research questions in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Read more...

Milestones cover

CCR’s 2017-18 Milestones publication is now available

Mar 26, 2018

Every year, the Center for Cancer Research makes remarkable contributions to the understanding, detection, treatment and prevention of cancer. The CCR’s annual publication, Milestones, features select research highlights from the past year to illustrate the quality and spectrum of our work in the basic and clinical sciences. Read the 2017-18 issue of Milestones…

CCR’s 2017-18 Milestones publication is now available
Moxie

CCR-led study identifies possible strategy to improve efficacy of moxetumomab in leukemia

Mar 19, 2018

A recent study identifies a possible strategy for improving the efficacy of moxetumomab pasudotox (Moxe), a toxin-based immunotherapy, for leukemia. For patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, clinical trials have demonstrated Moxe as a promising treatment, but patients quickly develop resistance to the drug, so benefits are limited. This new study, led by Ira Pastan, M.D., Co-Chief of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, suggests combining Moxe with a drug used to treat some types of blood cancer may help overcome resistance to the immunotoxin treatment. Read the full story on the NCI Cancer Currents Blog…

CCR-led study identifies possible strategy to improve efficacy of moxetumomab in leukemia
Scientists in lab

Three CCR accomplishments receive Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards

Feb 23, 2018

The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer has recognized three CCR accomplishments with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards. This award category honors employees of FLC member laboratories and non-laboratory staff who have accomplished outstanding work in the process of transferring federally developed technology. Read more…

ASCO logo

CCR scientists help develop first recommendations for managing mesothelioma

Feb 7, 2018

Anish Thomas, M.B.B.S., M.D., Investigator in the Developmental Therapeutics Branch, Markku Martti Miettinen, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Clinician in the Laboratory of Pathology, and Raffit Hassan, M.D., Co-Chief of the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch, are among the contributing authors of the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s first guidelines for evidence-based recommendations on the management of mesothelioma. The guidelines were informed by 222 relevant studies. The recommendations were developed for diagnosis, staging, chemotherapy, surgical cytoreduction, radiation therapy and multimodality therapy in patients with mesothelioma. Learn more…

CCR scientists help develop first recommendations for managing mesothelioma
Dr. Mark Roschewski

Mark Roschewski discusses significance of early detection in solid tumors with Newsweek

Jan 23, 2018

A recent Newsweek article profiles the capabilities of CancerSEEK, a blood-based cancer detection test that may improve detection of early-stage cancers, including those that are hard to detect. Mark Roschewski, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, offered insight on the value of early detection for patients with solid tumors, such as those of the pancreas. According to Dr. Roschewski, “In solid tumors, earlier detection is actually the key. The earlier that one could detect a patient with a tumor, the more likely that the intervention would succeed because the intervention is surgery.” Read the full article…

Mark Roschewski discusses significance of early detection in solid tumors with Newsweek
Sue Scott

New NCI video showcases one patient’s clinical-trial journey

Jan 11, 2018

Sue Scott was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2011. When standard treatment failed to eliminate her cancer cells, Scott’s doctor referred her to an immunotherapy clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with Christian Hinrichs, M.D., Investigator and Lasker Scholar in CCR’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch. Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment where the patient’s own immune system is used to fight the cancer. In this video, Sue details her story of survival and experience of taking part in a clinical trial with CCR. Watch the video here.

New NCI video showcases one patient’s clinical-trial journey
NBC4 logo

NBC4 interviews Foregut Team stomach-removal patient

Jan 4, 2018

The CDH1 gene mutation elevates an individual’s lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer to 60-70 percent. Total gastrectomy, or complete removal of the stomach, is a preventive option for persons with this anomaly. After receiving a positive result for the gene mutation at age 40, David Fogel began researching his options and decided to enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health led by Jeremy Davis, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch. As part of the trial, which aims to study the effects of stomach removal for patients with the CDH1 gene mutation, Fogel had his stomach removed in October 2017. In a recent interview with Washington’s NBC4, Fogel discussed life without a stomach with a fellow Maryland resident who also underwent a total gastrectomy after testing positive for the CDH1 mutation. Watch the video here

NBC4 interviews Foregut Team stomach-removal patient
Foregut team and patient

Foregut team stomach-removal patient featured in The Washington Post

Jan 4, 2018

Individuals with the CDH1 gene mutation have an increased risk of developing stomach cancer. Over the last two decades, total gastrectomy, or removal of the stomach, has become an extreme preventive option for those with the CDH1 mutation. After testing positive for the mutation at age 40, David Fogel began researching his options and decided to enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health led by Jeremy Davis, M.D., Staff Clinician in the Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Oncology Branch. As part of the trial, which aims to study the effects of stomach removal for patients with the CDH1 gene mutation, Fogel had his stomach completely removed in October 2017. Now months later, Fogel is in high spirits and has no regrets. Read the full story here.

Foregut team stomach-removal patient featured in The Washington Post

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