Early-phase clinical trial to test new CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma

Center for Cancer Research investigators led by James Kochenderfer, M.D., of the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, are conducting a clinical trial to test a new chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in patients whose multiple myeloma has persisted or relapsed despite standard therapy. Their goal is to develop a CAR T-cell therapy that provides lasting remission of a disease that remains highly resistant to current treatments. Read more...

Kenneth Kraemer

Kenneth Kraemer receives 2018 Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society Award

Sep 25, 2018

Kenneth Kraemer, M.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, has received the 2018 Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society (EMGS) Award. The annual award is given in recognition of outstanding research contributions in environmental mutagenisis. Dr. Kraemer is presenting the plenary lecture at the 2018 EMGS Annual Meeting on September 25, 2018, in San Antonio, Texas. Read more...

Kenneth Kraemer receives 2018 Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society Award
Barry O'Keefe

Barry O’Keefe featured in ShareAmerica article

Sep 19, 2018

Barry O’Keefe, Ph.D., Acting Chief of the Molecular Targets Program and Chief of the Natural Products Branch of the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, was featured in a ShareAmerica article. Dr. O’Keefe, along with an international team of scientists, worked together to figure out how to combine three HIV-blocking proteins into ordinary seeds of rice that could be turned into an ointment to prevent HIV infections. In the article, Dr. O’Keefe discusses natural products, particularly a powerful protein in marine red algae from New Zealand that he first showed in 2005 could work to kill HIV-related microbes. Read more...

Barry O’Keefe featured in ShareAmerica article
Nirali Shah

Nirali Shah featured on follow-up NPR “Shots” blog post

Sep 17, 2018

Nirali N. Shah, M.D., MHSc, Associate Research Physician in the Pediatric Oncology Branch, was recently featured in a follow-up story to a previous NPR “Shots” blog post. The post follows Aaron, a 20-year-old man from Lucedale, Mississippi, in an early-stage CAR-T clinical trial. This post revealed how Aaron responded to his latest round of treatment.  Read more...

Nirali Shah featured on follow-up NPR “Shots” blog post
leukemia

Moxetumomab pasudotox becomes first FDA-approved drug for resistant hairy cell leukemia

Sep 14, 2018

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved moxetumomab pasudotox for the treatment of some patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). A CCR researcher team led by Ira Pastan, M.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), discovered the drug, which was later licensed to MedImmune/AstraZeneca for clinical development. Robert Kreitman, M.D., Senior Investigator in LMB, led the clinical trials that showed moxetumomab to be an effective option for patients with relapsed or refractory HCL. Read more...

Moxetumomab pasudotox becomes first FDA-approved drug for resistant hairy cell leukemia
Elaine Jaffe

Elaine Jaffe to give Paulette Shirey Pritchett Endowed Lecture in Pathlogy

Sep 10, 2018

Elaine S. Jaffe, M.D., Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Pathology, will be giving the Paulette Shriey Pritchett Endowed Lecture in Pathology at the University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB) on September 17. This endowed lecture series is named in honor of Dr. Paulette Shirey Pritchett, a highly respected member of the UAB Pathology Department who unexpectedly passed away on August 4, 1984. Read more...

Elaine Jaffe to give Paulette Shirey Pritchett Endowed Lecture in Pathlogy
Lung cancer metastasis

Bacteria could promote lung cancer progression and be biomarkers for the disease

Sep 7, 2018

A laboratory study comparing the microbiome of human lung cancer tissue with non-cancerous lung tissue found higher amounts of specific types of bacteria in lung cancer tissue from smokers, especially tissue comprised of squamous non-small cells with mutations that turn off the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene. This finding could point the way to using bacteria in the microbiome of smokers as biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Read more...

Lymphoma

Our leukemia and lymphoma research

Sep 4, 2018

September is leukemia and lymphoma awareness month. Lymphoma is a broad term for cancer that begins in cells of the lymph system. The two main types are Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Leukemia is a broad term for cancers of the blood cells. The type of leukemia depends on the type of blood cell that becomes cancer and whether it grows quickly or slowly. To learn more about our leukemia and lymphoma research, click here.

Registration is now open for The Establishment and Control of Viral Persistence conference

Aug 29, 2018

The HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, is organizing this half-day conference to showcase the latest findings in the broad field of viral persistence. A major barrier to the successful eradication of many viral infections, including HIV, herpes viruses, Ebola virus and others, persistence is governed by a complex web of viral and cellular factors acting at the level of individuals and populations. An in-depth discussion of how viruses persist while hosts resist should lead to new strategies aimed at eliminating viruses entrenched in humans. Read more...

Registration is now open for The Establishment and Control of Viral Persistence conference
prostate cancer foundation

CCR researchers receive Prostate Cancer Foundation’s 2018 Young Investigator Awards

Aug 29, 2018

Jennifer Clare Jones, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Research Physician in the Vaccine Branch, and Scott Wilkinson, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Laboratory of Genitourinary Cancer Pathogenesis, are recipients of the Prostate Cancer Foundation's 2018 Young Investigator Awards. The award recognizes investigators who “demonstrate significant promise for having a long-term and impactful career in the prostate cancer research field”. Read more...

CCR researchers receive Prostate Cancer Foundation’s 2018 Young Investigator Awards
T cell

Essential gene network suggests potential therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

Aug 20, 2018

A new study by Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., has uncovered the critical importance of a complex of proteins, called BATF3 and IRF4, in regulating a pro-growth and survival network in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The results demonstrate that this network can be targeted with a class of drugs known as bromodomain-and-extra-terminal-domain (BET) inhibitors, suggesting a novel potential therapy for ATLL. Read more...

Pages