Scott M. Norberg, D.O.

Scott M. Norberg, D.O.
Assistant Research Physician

Dr. Norberg researches the use of immunotherapy and cellular therapy for a variety of conditions including human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) cancers and premalignant diseases caused by chronic HPV infection. His research focuses on understanding resistance to immunotherapy and cellular therapies and applying these treatment modalities to other conditions. 

Areas of Expertise
1) cell therapy 2) immunotherapy 3) human papillomavirus 4) cervical cancer 5) oropharyngeal cancer 6) anal cancer

Contact Info

Scott M. Norberg, D.O.
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 10, Room 6B09
Bethesda, MD 20892
Ph: 240-858-3303
scott.norberg@nih.gov

Dr. Norberg conducts clinical research to develop T cell therapies for the treatment of patients with cancer and precancerous diseases. This includes conducting clinical trials using genetically engineered T cells to treat patients with advanced human papillomavirus (HPV) malignancies.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Biomedical Engineering and Biophysics, Cancer Biology, Clinical Research, Immunology, Virology

Selected Recent Publications

  1. Norberg SM, Movva S.
    Curr Treat Options Oncol. 16(5): 24, 2015. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Nakahara T, Norberg SM, Shalinsky DR, Hu-Lowe DD, McDonald DM.
    Cancer Res. 66(3): 1434-45, 2006. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Parsons-Wingerter P, Kasman IM, Norberg S, Magnussen A, Zanivan S, Rissone A, Baluk P, Favre CJ, Jeffry U, Murray R, McDonald DM.
    Am J Pathol. 167(1): 193-211, 2005. [ Journal Article ]

Dr. Norberg received his B.S. from Saint Mary’s College of California and a M.S. in Medical Sciences at Drexel University. He received his medical degree at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Temple University Hospital and a fellowship in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Norberg conducts clinical research to develop T-cell therapies for patients with malignant and premalignant disease.