Hinrichs Clinical Research Team: News & Events

Doctor talking to a patient (iStock)New clinical trial will test immunotherapy for type of HPV infection

Vulvar high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) is caused by chronic infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16. Patients with vulvar HSIL have an increased risk of developing cancer. Lesions are usually treated surgically. However, the vulvar lesions commonly recur because of persistent systemic infection with HPV. Learn more...

Aricca Wallace and Dr. HinrichsUsing the immune system to fight, and win, the battle against cervical cancer

Aricca Wallace and Christian Hinrichs, M.D., catch up like old friends each time she comes to the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center for follow-up appointments. She updates him on her two boys’ wrestling competitions and state titles. He shows her pictures of the new puppy that is terrorizing his house. So far, they’ve finished each visit with Dr. Hinrichs telling her she is still cancer-free, something she never thought she would hear following her diagnosis with metastatic cervical cancer.  Learn more...

HeLa cervical cellsNew targets for immunotherapy-based treatment of HPV-related cancers

Immunotherapies designed to treat cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), including cervical, anal and oropharyngeal cancers, have traditionally targeted protein antigens produced by the virus itself. However, such treatments have so far had little success in the regression of HPV-related cancers.

Now, in a study published April 14 in Science scientists at the Center for Cancer Research and three other cancer research institutions show that immunotherapy treatments that resulted in complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer largely targeted two non-viral antigens. Read more...

FDA approves pembrolizumab for head and neck cancer

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pembrolizumab (Keytruda®) on August 5, 2016 for the treatment of some patients with an advanced form of head and neck cancer. Read more...

Scans at baseline and at 20 months post-treatment

ETIB opens clinical trial for patients with HPV-16+ cancers

Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types.  Learn more...

T cells attacking a cancer cell

New phase II trial of avelumab, a PD-L1 inhibitor, in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types. Learn more...

Spectrum of colors

T cells that recognize HPV protein can target virus-infected cells

Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types.  Learn more...

Scans from patient 3 before treatment and at 22 months post-treatment

Adoptive T-cell therapy promising for metastatic cervical cancer

Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types. Read more...


Videos


Immunotherapy Clinical Trials: Sue Scott’s Story of Survival