Kandice  Tanner, Ph.D.
Kandice Tanner, Ph.D.
Investigator
Head, Tissue Morphodynamics Unit

Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute

Building 37, Room 2132
Bethesda, MD 20892-4256
301-435-6296

The Tanner lab has determined that cells cans switch between different types of motility namely rotation, random and amoeboid when placed in 3D biomimetic platforms. We have linked the type of motility to the establishment of distinct multicellular architectures and tissue polarity. The mechanisms establishing and controlling tissue polarity are central both to normal tissue function and disease. However, the fundamental biophysical processes by which a single cell must undergo multiple rounds of mitosis to assemble into polarized tissue-like structures remain elusive. We go a step further to link the lessons learned from epithelial morphogenesis to dissect the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying de novo tumor organogenesis.

Areas of Expertise
1) multimodal imaging platforms 2) 3D cell culture 3) biophysics 4) breast cancer 5) melanoma 6) mechanobiology
Selected Publications
  1. Boudreau A, Tanner K, Wang D, Geyer FC, Reis-Filho JS, Bissell MJ.
    Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.. 110: E3937-44, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Brownfield DG, Venugopalan G, Lo A, Mori H, Tanner K, Fletcher DA, Bissell MJ.
    Curr. Biol.. 23: 703-9, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Tanner K, Mori H, Mroue R, Bruni-Cardoso A, Bissell MJ.
    Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109: 1973-8, 2012. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Tanner K.
    Phys Biol. 9: 65003, 2012. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Tanner K, Boudreau A, Bissell MJ, Kumar S.
    Biophys. J. 99: 2775-83, 2010. [ Journal Article ]

Kandice Tanner received her doctoral degree in Physics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign under Professor Enrico Gratton. Her thesis involved the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for non-invasive imaging of the mammalian brain with theoretical and experimental validation in an animal model. She was awarded a dissertation prize for her graduate work. She completed post-doctoral training at the University of California, Irvine specializing in dynamic imaging of thick tissues. She then became a Department of Defense Breast Cancer Post-doctoral fellow jointly at University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Dr. Mina J. Bissell. Dr. Tanner joined the NCI as a Tenure-Track Investigator in July, 2012. The Tanner lab focuses on the physical mechanisms of morphogenesis from single cell to tissues, in 3D cell cultures as well as in vivo in animal models.

Name Position
Anna Afasizheva B.S. Postbaccalaureate Fellow
Benjamin Blehm Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (CRTA)
Alexus Devine Summer Student
Nancy Jiang Summer Student
Jiyun Kim Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Yorihisa Kotobuki Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Esther Michel Summer Student

Summary

The Tanner lab has determined that cells cans switch between different types of motility namely rotation, random and amoeboid when placed in 3D biomimetic platforms. We have linked the type of motility to the establishment of distinct multicellular architectures and tissue polarity. The mechanisms establishing and controlling tissue polarity are central both to normal tissue function and disease. However, the fundamental biophysical processes by which a single cell must undergo multiple rounds of mitosis to assemble into polarized tissue-like structures remain elusive. We go a step further to link the lessons learned from epithelial morphogenesis to dissect the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying de novo tumor organogenesis.

Areas of Expertise
1) multimodal imaging platforms 2) 3D cell culture 3) biophysics 4) breast cancer 5) melanoma 6) mechanobiology

Publications

Selected Publications
  1. Boudreau A, Tanner K, Wang D, Geyer FC, Reis-Filho JS, Bissell MJ.
    Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.. 110: E3937-44, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Brownfield DG, Venugopalan G, Lo A, Mori H, Tanner K, Fletcher DA, Bissell MJ.
    Curr. Biol.. 23: 703-9, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Tanner K, Mori H, Mroue R, Bruni-Cardoso A, Bissell MJ.
    Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109: 1973-8, 2012. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Tanner K.
    Phys Biol. 9: 65003, 2012. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Tanner K, Boudreau A, Bissell MJ, Kumar S.
    Biophys. J. 99: 2775-83, 2010. [ Journal Article ]

Biography

Kandice Tanner received her doctoral degree in Physics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign under Professor Enrico Gratton. Her thesis involved the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for non-invasive imaging of the mammalian brain with theoretical and experimental validation in an animal model. She was awarded a dissertation prize for her graduate work. She completed post-doctoral training at the University of California, Irvine specializing in dynamic imaging of thick tissues. She then became a Department of Defense Breast Cancer Post-doctoral fellow jointly at University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Dr. Mina J. Bissell. Dr. Tanner joined the NCI as a Tenure-Track Investigator in July, 2012. The Tanner lab focuses on the physical mechanisms of morphogenesis from single cell to tissues, in 3D cell cultures as well as in vivo in animal models.

Team

Name Position
Anna Afasizheva B.S. Postbaccalaureate Fellow
Benjamin Blehm Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (CRTA)
Alexus Devine Summer Student
Nancy Jiang Summer Student
Jiyun Kim Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Yorihisa Kotobuki Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Esther Michel Summer Student