Clinical trial for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies now recruiting

B-cell lymphoma cells

B-cell lymphomas are blood cancers that affect B-cells, white blood cells that develop and mature in bone marrow in the core of most bones. Mark Roschewski, M.D., of the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch is leading a study of a new treatment for B-cell lymphomas that have not responded to radiation and chemotherapy. 
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B-cell lymphomas are blood cancers that affect B-cells, white blood cells that develop and mature in bone marrow in the core of most bones. B-cells are part of the immune system that protects the body against infectious disease and foreign invaders. Mark Roschewski, M.D, of the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch is leading a study of a new treatment for B-cell lymphomas that have not responded to radiation and chemotherapy. Investigators hope that combining acalabrutinib and vistusertib will slow the growth of malignant B-cells, as these drugs interfere with different types of kinases – enzymes that play a vital role in regulating B-cell growth and activity. Both drugs have anticancer activity and studies suggest they may be even more effective when used together.

For more information about this trial, please visit: https://ccr.cancer.gov/Lymphoid-Malignancies-Branch/mark-j-roschewski

The Center for Cancer Research is NCI’s internal cancer center, a publicly funded organization working to improve the lives of cancer patients by solving important, challenging and neglected problems in cancer research and patient care.  Highly trained physician-scientists develop and carry out clinical trials to create the medicines of tomorrow by treating patients at the world’s largest dedicated research hospital on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Search all CCR clinical trials, and subscribe to have the latest CCR clinical trials sent to your inbox.

 

Summary Posted: 11/2017