C. Norman Coleman, M.D.
C. Norman  Coleman, M.D.
Adjunct Investigator
Head, Experimental Therapeutics Section
Associate Director, Radiation Research Program, DCTD
Senior Medical Advisor, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, DHHS

The research focus is on radiation-induced molecular targets that can be utilized with molecular targeted drug (or immuno-) therapy to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy. An overarching concept is the exploitation of radiation therapy and the advanced technology as 'focused biology' wherein radiation is described by the molecular events produced rather than by just the dose in Gray. We are studying the phenotypic changes after a large single dose as used in hypofractionation and after multi-fraction radiation at 1-2 Gy per fraction to take advantage of the tumor cell adaptation (called MF Adaptive response). Other interests include nuclear –radiological emergencies and health disparities/global health.

Areas of Expertise
1) Radiation oncology 2) Radiation biology 3) Molecular targeted therapy 4) Radiation stress response 5) Global health

Contact Info

C. Norman Coleman, M.D.

Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute

Building 10 - Hatfield CRC, Room B2-3561
Bethesda, MD 20892-1682
301-496-5457

Dr. Coleman's current research program is based on long-standing interest in the tumor-induced and radiation-induced stress responses. The long-term focus is on developing molecular targeted radiation therapy. An overarching concept is of radiation therapy as 'focused biology' wherein radiation is described by the molecular events produced rather than by just the dose in Gray. Based on long-standing interest in NSAIDs and COX inhibitors, a focus of the laboratory over the last few years has been studying the effects of drugs and molecular-targeted agents at clinically relevant concentrations.

Using COX inhibition as an example, we have demonstrated that the gene expression profile is very different when NSAIDs and COX2 inhibitors are used at high versus a low, clinically relevant concentration and also that siRNA is different than any of the drug conditions. This emphasizes the critical importance of using clinically relevant concentrations for preclinical mechanism and biomarker studies. That the NSAIDs induced a cardiovascular gene profile in both tumor and normal tissue (Note- this limited clinical utility of COX-2 inhibitors not discovered until post-market evaluation) suggests that it might be possible to predict normal tissue toxicity of drugs using molecular profiling, an observation being pursued. A radiation-inducible molecular targets program underway began in collaboration with Dr. Jim Mitchell that builds on our 'focused biology' approach in which radiation can create molecular changes within the radiation field that can be uniquely exploited.

These changes may be useful in inducing or enhancing cell killing by drugs and molecular-target agents and a novel therapeutic approach for radiation oncology. This builds on both the non-oncogene addiction and synthetic lethality models. The changes we have studied include gene expression, miRNA, phosho- protein NS metabolomics changes with single and fractionated doses. In this 'nano-IMRT' concept, the radiation dose and fractionation will be selected based on molecular target activation. Dr. Coleman's efforts in the Radiation Research Program, DCTD include the Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch (Dr. Vikram), Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch (Dr. Ahmed) and the Radiotherapy Development Program (Dr. Bernhard). The RRP efforts in addition to the grants management and support include cancer disparities (Dr. Wong), radiation therapy technology and quality assurance (Dr. Capala), global health (Dr. Vikram), overall radiation research initiatives (Drs. Bernhard, Prasanna, Ahmed and Wong) and the support of clinical trials through CTEP (Drs. Vikram and Capala). There is ongoing collaboration between NCI and NIAID (Dr.Maidment) to develop medical countermeasures for radiation injury and biodosimetry (Drs. Aryankalayil and Prasanna). Dr. Coleman and Dr. Judith Bader are subject matter experts working on the civilian medical response to radiation and nuclear related incidents in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response HHS.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Cancer Biology, Clinical Research, Health Disparities, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

View Dr. Coleman's PubMed Summary.

Selected Recent Publications
  1. Makinde AY, John-Aryankalayil M, Palayoor ST, Cerna D, Coleman CN.
    Mol Cancer Res. 11(1): 5-12, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Palayoor ST, John-Aryankalayil M, Makinde AY, Falduto MT, Magnuson SR, Coleman CN
    Mol. Cancer Res.. 12(7): 1002-1015, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Coleman CN.
    Radiat Res. 179(1): 1-8, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Coleman CN, Sullivan JM, Bader JL, Murrain-Hill P, Koerner JF, Garrett AL, Weinstock DM, Case C Jr, Hrdina C, Adams SA, Whitcomb RC, Graeden E, Shankman R, Lant T, Maidment BW, Hatchett RC
    Health Phys. 108(2): 149-160, 2015. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Coleman CN, Love RR
    Sci Transl Med. 22(6): 259, 2014. [ Journal Article ]

Dr. Coleman graduated from the University of Vermont with a B.A. in mathematics, and then graduated from Yale University School of Medicine in 1970. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of California in San Francisco, medical oncology at the NCI and radiation oncology at Stanford. Board certified in internal medicine, medical oncology and radiation oncology, Dr. Coleman was a tenured faculty member at the Stanford University School of Medicine before joining Harvard Medical School in 1985 as Fuller-American Cancer Society Professor and Chairman, Joint Center for Radiation Therapy. In 1999, he came to the NCI and became director of the new Radiation Oncology Sciences Program that he created to coordinate all radiation oncology activities. He served as chief of the Radiation Oncology Branch from 1999- 2004 and is now an adjunct member of ROB. He serves the NCI as associate director of the Radiation Research Program (in DCTD). Since 2004 he has been Senior Medical Advisor and medical chief of the CBRNE Team in the Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations (OPEO), Office of Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), HHS. He has written extensively in the fields of radiation modifiers and, more recently, on preparedness and planning for radiological or nuclear emergencies and global health. He received the 2011 Service to America Homeland Security Medal.

Name Position
Molykutty Aryankalayil Ph.D. Research Biologist
Margeaux Dionne Summer Student
Iris Eke Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Alexander Engelman Special Volunteer
Adeola Makinde Ph.D. Research Fellow
Sanjeewani Palayoor Ph.D. Research Collaborator
Patricia Rivera Solis Postbaccalaureate Fellow

Research

Dr. Coleman's current research program is based on long-standing interest in the tumor-induced and radiation-induced stress responses. The long-term focus is on developing molecular targeted radiation therapy. An overarching concept is of radiation therapy as 'focused biology' wherein radiation is described by the molecular events produced rather than by just the dose in Gray. Based on long-standing interest in NSAIDs and COX inhibitors, a focus of the laboratory over the last few years has been studying the effects of drugs and molecular-targeted agents at clinically relevant concentrations.

Using COX inhibition as an example, we have demonstrated that the gene expression profile is very different when NSAIDs and COX2 inhibitors are used at high versus a low, clinically relevant concentration and also that siRNA is different than any of the drug conditions. This emphasizes the critical importance of using clinically relevant concentrations for preclinical mechanism and biomarker studies. That the NSAIDs induced a cardiovascular gene profile in both tumor and normal tissue (Note- this limited clinical utility of COX-2 inhibitors not discovered until post-market evaluation) suggests that it might be possible to predict normal tissue toxicity of drugs using molecular profiling, an observation being pursued. A radiation-inducible molecular targets program underway began in collaboration with Dr. Jim Mitchell that builds on our 'focused biology' approach in which radiation can create molecular changes within the radiation field that can be uniquely exploited.

These changes may be useful in inducing or enhancing cell killing by drugs and molecular-target agents and a novel therapeutic approach for radiation oncology. This builds on both the non-oncogene addiction and synthetic lethality models. The changes we have studied include gene expression, miRNA, phosho- protein NS metabolomics changes with single and fractionated doses. In this 'nano-IMRT' concept, the radiation dose and fractionation will be selected based on molecular target activation. Dr. Coleman's efforts in the Radiation Research Program, DCTD include the Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch (Dr. Vikram), Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch (Dr. Ahmed) and the Radiotherapy Development Program (Dr. Bernhard). The RRP efforts in addition to the grants management and support include cancer disparities (Dr. Wong), radiation therapy technology and quality assurance (Dr. Capala), global health (Dr. Vikram), overall radiation research initiatives (Drs. Bernhard, Prasanna, Ahmed and Wong) and the support of clinical trials through CTEP (Drs. Vikram and Capala). There is ongoing collaboration between NCI and NIAID (Dr.Maidment) to develop medical countermeasures for radiation injury and biodosimetry (Drs. Aryankalayil and Prasanna). Dr. Coleman and Dr. Judith Bader are subject matter experts working on the civilian medical response to radiation and nuclear related incidents in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response HHS.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Cancer Biology, Clinical Research, Health Disparities, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

Publications

View Dr. Coleman's PubMed Summary.

Selected Recent Publications
  1. Makinde AY, John-Aryankalayil M, Palayoor ST, Cerna D, Coleman CN.
    Mol Cancer Res. 11(1): 5-12, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Palayoor ST, John-Aryankalayil M, Makinde AY, Falduto MT, Magnuson SR, Coleman CN
    Mol. Cancer Res.. 12(7): 1002-1015, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Coleman CN.
    Radiat Res. 179(1): 1-8, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Coleman CN, Sullivan JM, Bader JL, Murrain-Hill P, Koerner JF, Garrett AL, Weinstock DM, Case C Jr, Hrdina C, Adams SA, Whitcomb RC, Graeden E, Shankman R, Lant T, Maidment BW, Hatchett RC
    Health Phys. 108(2): 149-160, 2015. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Coleman CN, Love RR
    Sci Transl Med. 22(6): 259, 2014. [ Journal Article ]

Biography

Dr. Coleman graduated from the University of Vermont with a B.A. in mathematics, and then graduated from Yale University School of Medicine in 1970. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of California in San Francisco, medical oncology at the NCI and radiation oncology at Stanford. Board certified in internal medicine, medical oncology and radiation oncology, Dr. Coleman was a tenured faculty member at the Stanford University School of Medicine before joining Harvard Medical School in 1985 as Fuller-American Cancer Society Professor and Chairman, Joint Center for Radiation Therapy. In 1999, he came to the NCI and became director of the new Radiation Oncology Sciences Program that he created to coordinate all radiation oncology activities. He served as chief of the Radiation Oncology Branch from 1999- 2004 and is now an adjunct member of ROB. He serves the NCI as associate director of the Radiation Research Program (in DCTD). Since 2004 he has been Senior Medical Advisor and medical chief of the CBRNE Team in the Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations (OPEO), Office of Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), HHS. He has written extensively in the fields of radiation modifiers and, more recently, on preparedness and planning for radiological or nuclear emergencies and global health. He received the 2011 Service to America Homeland Security Medal.

Team

Name Position
Molykutty Aryankalayil Ph.D. Research Biologist
Margeaux Dionne Summer Student
Iris Eke Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Alexander Engelman Special Volunteer
Adeola Makinde Ph.D. Research Fellow
Sanjeewani Palayoor Ph.D. Research Collaborator
Patricia Rivera Solis Postbaccalaureate Fellow