Brad St. Croix, Ph.D.
Senior Associate Scientist
Head, Tumor Angiogenesis Section

Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute

Building 560, Room 32-34
Frederick, MD 21702-1201
301-846-7456

Dr. St. Croix pioneered the development of methods to uncover molecules expressed on the tumor vasculature. He is now exploiting this new knowledge to better understand the process of new blood vessel formation, i.e. angiogenesis, and target the neovasculature that feeds tumors in order to develop more effective therapies for cancer. His recent studies describe the development of new therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that that are non-toxic and have potential to aid in the management of cancer and other vascular diseases. Dr. St. Croix’s laboratory develops new approaches to detect and treat primary and metastatic disease through targeting of the tumor microenvironment.

Areas of Expertise
1) Tumor angiogenesis 2) Endothelial cell biology 3) Vascular biology 4) Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8)/Antrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1) 5) TEM5/G-protein coupled receptor 124 (GPR124) 6) Metastasis

New blood vessel formation, or angiogenesis, is a critical hallmark of solid tumor growth and anti-angiogenic agents have become a vital component of current cancer treatment regimens. The appeal of anti-angiogenic therapy can be attributed to several advantages of targeting the endothelial cells that line blood vessels, rather than the tumor cells themselves. First, endothelial cells are directly exposed to circulating blood, facilitating drug delivery and enabling the use of high molecular weight therapeutics. Second, each vessel capillary supports hundreds of tumor cells. Third, endothelial cells are genetically stable and their ability to develop resistance may be limited. Finally, this type of therapy should be applicable to a wide variety of tumor types. Several anti-angiogenic agents that target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, tumors can exploit alternative angiogenesis mechanisms when the VEGF pathway is blocked.

A major current goal of our laboratory is to understand the mechanisms of VEGF-independent angiogenesis that can lead to persistent tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. Our laboratory is also working to understand the biological functions of several cell surface Tumor Endothelial Markers (TEMs) that were previously found to be elevated in the angiogenic vessels of tumors. Two receptors, TEM5/GPR124 and TEM8/ANTXR1 are of particular interest because of their critical role in angiogenesis. We are using several genetically engineered mouse models to understand the functional role of these TEMs in vivo. We are also developing novel therapeutics, such as TEM8 neutralizing antibodies, in order to block angiogenesis and tumor growth. The end goal of this research is to use new molecular information on tumor angiogenesis to develop clinically useful agents for improved diagnostics and therapeutics of cancer and other vascular diseases.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Cancer Biology, Cell Biology
Selected Recent Publications
  1. Posokhova E, Shukla A, Seaman S, Volate S, Hilton MB, Wu B, Morris H, Swing DA, Zhou M, Zudaire E, Rubin JS, St Croix B
    Cell Rep. 10(2): 123-130, 2015. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Improving VEGF-targeted therapies through inhibition of COX-2/PGE2 signaling.
    Xu L and St. Croix B
    Mol Cell. Oncology. 1(4): e969154, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Emenaker NJ, Zudaire E, St Croix B
    Oncotarget. 5(16): 6556-6557, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Xu L, Stevens J, Hilton MB, Seaman S, Conrads TP, Veenstra TD, Logsdon D, Morris H, Swing DA, Patel NL, Kalen J, Haines DC, Zudaire E, St Croix B
    Sci Transl Med. 6: 242ra84, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Yang MY, Hilton MB, Seaman S, Haines DC, Nagashima K, Burks CM, Tessarollo L, Ivanova PT, Brown HA, Umstead TM, Floros J, Chroneos ZC, St Croix B.
    Cell Rep. 3: 1457-64, 2013. [ Journal Article ]

Dr. Brad St. Croix received his Ph.D. in Medical Biophysics from the University of Toronto in 1998, under Dr. Robert S. Kerbel. He trained as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins University under a fellowship from the National Cancer Institute of Canada. In 2002, he established the Tumor Angiogenesis Group at the Center for Cancer Research, NCI. His laboratory focuses on the identification of molecules involved in human tumor angiogenesis and utilizes mouse models to translate new molecular information on angiogenesis into the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for cancer.

Position Number of Positions Contact E-mail Contact Name Contact Phone
Postdoctoral Fellow 1

stcroix@ncifcrf.gov

Brad St. Croix 301-846-7456
Name Position
Ekaterina Allen Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Mary Beth Hilton Animal Technician (Contr)
Steven Seaman Senior Research Assistant
Animesh Shukla Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Christopher Szot Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (CRTA)

Summary

Dr. St. Croix pioneered the development of methods to uncover molecules expressed on the tumor vasculature. He is now exploiting this new knowledge to better understand the process of new blood vessel formation, i.e. angiogenesis, and target the neovasculature that feeds tumors in order to develop more effective therapies for cancer. His recent studies describe the development of new therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that that are non-toxic and have potential to aid in the management of cancer and other vascular diseases. Dr. St. Croix’s laboratory develops new approaches to detect and treat primary and metastatic disease through targeting of the tumor microenvironment.

Areas of Expertise
1) Tumor angiogenesis 2) Endothelial cell biology 3) Vascular biology 4) Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8)/Antrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1) 5) TEM5/G-protein coupled receptor 124 (GPR124) 6) Metastasis

Research

New blood vessel formation, or angiogenesis, is a critical hallmark of solid tumor growth and anti-angiogenic agents have become a vital component of current cancer treatment regimens. The appeal of anti-angiogenic therapy can be attributed to several advantages of targeting the endothelial cells that line blood vessels, rather than the tumor cells themselves. First, endothelial cells are directly exposed to circulating blood, facilitating drug delivery and enabling the use of high molecular weight therapeutics. Second, each vessel capillary supports hundreds of tumor cells. Third, endothelial cells are genetically stable and their ability to develop resistance may be limited. Finally, this type of therapy should be applicable to a wide variety of tumor types. Several anti-angiogenic agents that target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, tumors can exploit alternative angiogenesis mechanisms when the VEGF pathway is blocked.

A major current goal of our laboratory is to understand the mechanisms of VEGF-independent angiogenesis that can lead to persistent tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. Our laboratory is also working to understand the biological functions of several cell surface Tumor Endothelial Markers (TEMs) that were previously found to be elevated in the angiogenic vessels of tumors. Two receptors, TEM5/GPR124 and TEM8/ANTXR1 are of particular interest because of their critical role in angiogenesis. We are using several genetically engineered mouse models to understand the functional role of these TEMs in vivo. We are also developing novel therapeutics, such as TEM8 neutralizing antibodies, in order to block angiogenesis and tumor growth. The end goal of this research is to use new molecular information on tumor angiogenesis to develop clinically useful agents for improved diagnostics and therapeutics of cancer and other vascular diseases.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Cancer Biology, Cell Biology

Publications

Selected Recent Publications
  1. Posokhova E, Shukla A, Seaman S, Volate S, Hilton MB, Wu B, Morris H, Swing DA, Zhou M, Zudaire E, Rubin JS, St Croix B
    Cell Rep. 10(2): 123-130, 2015. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Improving VEGF-targeted therapies through inhibition of COX-2/PGE2 signaling.
    Xu L and St. Croix B
    Mol Cell. Oncology. 1(4): e969154, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Emenaker NJ, Zudaire E, St Croix B
    Oncotarget. 5(16): 6556-6557, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Xu L, Stevens J, Hilton MB, Seaman S, Conrads TP, Veenstra TD, Logsdon D, Morris H, Swing DA, Patel NL, Kalen J, Haines DC, Zudaire E, St Croix B
    Sci Transl Med. 6: 242ra84, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Yang MY, Hilton MB, Seaman S, Haines DC, Nagashima K, Burks CM, Tessarollo L, Ivanova PT, Brown HA, Umstead TM, Floros J, Chroneos ZC, St Croix B.
    Cell Rep. 3: 1457-64, 2013. [ Journal Article ]

Biography

Dr. Brad St. Croix received his Ph.D. in Medical Biophysics from the University of Toronto in 1998, under Dr. Robert S. Kerbel. He trained as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins University under a fellowship from the National Cancer Institute of Canada. In 2002, he established the Tumor Angiogenesis Group at the Center for Cancer Research, NCI. His laboratory focuses on the identification of molecules involved in human tumor angiogenesis and utilizes mouse models to translate new molecular information on angiogenesis into the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for cancer.

Positions

Position Number of Positions Contact E-mail Contact Name Contact Phone
Postdoctoral Fellow 1

stcroix@ncifcrf.gov

Brad St. Croix 301-846-7456

Team

Name Position
Ekaterina Allen Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Mary Beth Hilton Animal Technician (Contr)
Steven Seaman Senior Research Assistant
Animesh Shukla Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (Visiting)
Christopher Szot Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow (CRTA)