Alberto  Bartesaghi, Ph.D.
Alberto Bartesaghi, Ph.D.
Associate Scientist

Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute

Building 50, Room 4306
Bethesda, MD 20892-8008
301-594-0552

Dr. Bartesaghi has pioneered the development and application of novel image processing methods in three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopy to determine the structures of a variety of macromolecular assemblies of fundamental biomedical interest. He is responsible for the design, automation and optimization of image processing workflows, both for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) modalities, and for managing the computational resources of the group. This state-of-the-art processing infrastructure serves as a powerful tool to elucidate protein structure at the highest possible resolution of biomedically relevant complexes, including membrane proteins, transporters involved in signaling and metabolism, and glycoproteins of enveloped viruses.

Areas of Expertise
1) image analysis, 2) cryo-electron microscopy 3) cryo-electron tomography, 4) protein structure determination, 5) high throughput and automation, 6) high-resolution cryo-EM

Dr. Bartesaghi's research is devoted to the development of computational imaging technologies that are the frontier of the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) field. He develops advanced computational techniques that serve as powerful tools for structure determination of a variety of macromolecular complexes, to efficiently and accurately convert raw images into three-dimensional (3D) representations of assemblies at the highest possible resolution. Importantly, these methods address essential technical aspects that are necessary for the extension of methods in cryo-electron microscopy to study small dynamic protein complexes, including membrane proteins such as G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters and channels that are of fundamental biomedical interest.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Structural Biology
Selected Recent Publications
  1. Meyerson JR, Kumar J, Chittori S, Rao P, Pierson J, Bartesaghi A, Mayer ML, and Subramaniam, S.
    Nature. 514: 328-34, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Bartesaghi A, Matthies D, Banerjee S, Merk A, and Subramaniam S.
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 111: 11709-14, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Bartesaghi A, Merk A, Borgnia MJ, Milne JL, Subramaniam S.
    Nat Struct Mol Biol. 20: 1352-7, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Bartesaghi A, Lecumberry F, Sapiro G, and Subramaniam S.
    Structure. 20: 2003-13, 2012. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Liu J, Bartesaghi A, Borgnia, MJ, Sapiro G and Subramaniam S.
    Nature. 455: 109-13, 2008. [ Journal Article ]

Dr. Alberto Bartesaghi received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the Instituto de Ingeniera Electrica, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo, in 1999 and 2001, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in 2005. He joined the Laboratory of Cell Biology at the National Cancer Institute, NIH in 2005 to conduct his postdoctoral studies, and became a Staff Scientist in 2008 and an Associate Scientist in 2015.

Summary

Dr. Bartesaghi has pioneered the development and application of novel image processing methods in three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopy to determine the structures of a variety of macromolecular assemblies of fundamental biomedical interest. He is responsible for the design, automation and optimization of image processing workflows, both for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) modalities, and for managing the computational resources of the group. This state-of-the-art processing infrastructure serves as a powerful tool to elucidate protein structure at the highest possible resolution of biomedically relevant complexes, including membrane proteins, transporters involved in signaling and metabolism, and glycoproteins of enveloped viruses.

Areas of Expertise
1) image analysis, 2) cryo-electron microscopy 3) cryo-electron tomography, 4) protein structure determination, 5) high throughput and automation, 6) high-resolution cryo-EM

Research

Dr. Bartesaghi's research is devoted to the development of computational imaging technologies that are the frontier of the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) field. He develops advanced computational techniques that serve as powerful tools for structure determination of a variety of macromolecular complexes, to efficiently and accurately convert raw images into three-dimensional (3D) representations of assemblies at the highest possible resolution. Importantly, these methods address essential technical aspects that are necessary for the extension of methods in cryo-electron microscopy to study small dynamic protein complexes, including membrane proteins such as G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters and channels that are of fundamental biomedical interest.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Structural Biology

Publications

Selected Recent Publications
  1. Meyerson JR, Kumar J, Chittori S, Rao P, Pierson J, Bartesaghi A, Mayer ML, and Subramaniam, S.
    Nature. 514: 328-34, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Bartesaghi A, Matthies D, Banerjee S, Merk A, and Subramaniam S.
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 111: 11709-14, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Bartesaghi A, Merk A, Borgnia MJ, Milne JL, Subramaniam S.
    Nat Struct Mol Biol. 20: 1352-7, 2013. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Bartesaghi A, Lecumberry F, Sapiro G, and Subramaniam S.
    Structure. 20: 2003-13, 2012. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Liu J, Bartesaghi A, Borgnia, MJ, Sapiro G and Subramaniam S.
    Nature. 455: 109-13, 2008. [ Journal Article ]

Biography

Dr. Alberto Bartesaghi received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the Instituto de Ingeniera Electrica, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo, in 1999 and 2001, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in 2005. He joined the Laboratory of Cell Biology at the National Cancer Institute, NIH in 2005 to conduct his postdoctoral studies, and became a Staff Scientist in 2008 and an Associate Scientist in 2015.