Darawalee Wangsa Zong, Ph.D.

Darawalee Wangsa Zong, Ph.D.
Research Biologist

Team Member of:

To address the question of aneuploidy, our lab has generated artificial trisomies to determine what effect it would have on the transcriptome. We are interested in further utilizing these cell lines in our studies to identify the role aneuploidy-driven gene expression changes in tumorigenesis. We are also interested in elucidating the consequences of tumorigenesis on the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of chromosomes and exploring its impact on transcriptional activity

Areas of Expertise
1) chromosomal aneuploidy, 2) tumorigenesis

Contact Info

Darawalee Wangsa Zong, Ph.D.
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 50, Room 1408
Bethesda, MD 20892-8010
Ph: 240760-6389
darawalee.zong@nih.gov

A key hallmark of colorectal cancer progression is genomic instability, with chromosomal aneuploidy frequently observed. Based on previous work in our laboratory and elsewhere, specific aneuploidy has been shown to occur before the transition to invasive disease. These genomic imbalances are maintained when cells metastasize and are conserved in cells lines derived from primary tumors. A constant selective pressure to maintain these specific aneuploid cells suggests a vital role in cancer tumorigenesis. However, it remains unknown what impact these genomic balances have on the transcriptome of cancer cells.

In order to address the question of aneuploidy, our lab has generated artificial trisomies to determine what effect these would have on the transcriptome. We are interested in further utilizing these cell lines in our studies to identify the role of aneuploidy-driven gene expression changes in tumorigenesis. We are also interested in elucidating the consequences of tumorigenesis on the 3D architecture of chromosomes and exploring its impact on transcriptional activity.

Scientific Focus Areas:
Genetics and Genomics

Selected Recent Publications

  1. Nicholson JM, Macedo JC, Mattingly AJ, Wangsa D, Camps J, Lima V, Gomes AM, Dória S, Ried T, Logarinho E, Cimini D.
    eLife. May 5: 2015. [ Journal Article ]
  2. Zhang Y, Calado R, Rao M, Hong JA, Meeker AK, Dumitriu B, Atay S, McCormick PJ, Garfield SH, Wangsa D, Padilla-Nash HM, Burkett S, Zhang M, Kunst TF, Peterson NR, Xi S, Inchauste S, Altorki NK, Casson AG, Beer DG, Harris CC, Ried T, Young NS, Schrump DS.
    PLoS One. 9(7): e101010., 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  3. Camps J, Wangsa D, Falke M, Brown M, Case CM, Erdos MR, Ried T.
    FASEB J. 28(8): 3423-34, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  4. Akagi K, Li J, Broutian TR, Padilla-Nash H, Xiao W, Jiang B, Rocco JW, Teknos TN, Kumar B, Wangsa D, He D, Ried T, Symer DE, Gillison ML.
    Genome Res. 24(2): 185-99, 2014. [ Journal Article ]
  5. Roukos V, Voss TC, Schmidt CK, Lee S, Wangsa D, Misteli T.
    Science. 341(6146): 660-4, 2013. [ Journal Article ]