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Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D.

Portait Photo of Steven Rosenberg
Surgery Branch
Head, Tumor Immunology Section
Branch Chief
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 10 - Hatfield CRC, Room 3-3940
Bethesda, MD 20892-1201
Phone:  
301-496-4164
Fax:  
301-402-1738
E-Mail:  
SAR@nih.gov

Biography

Dr. Rosenberg is Chief of Surgery at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland and a Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences and the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He received his B.A. and M.D. degrees at Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. in Biophysics at Harvard University. After completing his residency training in surgery in 1974 at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Rosenberg became the Chief of Surgery at the NCI, NIH, a position he has held to the present time. Dr. Rosenberg developed the first effective immunotherapies and gene therapies for patients with advanced cancer. His studies of cell transfer immunotherapy have resulted in durable complete remissions in patients with metastatic melanoma. He was the first to successfully insert foreign genes into humans and his recent studies of the adoptive transfer of genetically modified lymphocytes has resulted in the regression of metastatic cancer in patients with melanoma, sarcomas and lymphomas.

Research

Dr. Rosenberg has pioneered the development of immunotherapy that has resulted in the first effective immunotherapies for selected patients with advanced cancer. His studies of cell transfer immunotherapy have resulted in durable complete remissions in patients with metastatic melanoma. He has also pioneered the development of gene therapy and was the first to successfully insert foreign genes into humans. His recent studies of the adoptive transfer of genetically modified lymphocytes has resulted in the regression of metastatic cancer in patients with melanoma, sarcomas and lymphomas.

This page was last updated on 11/21/2013.