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Our Science – Subramaniam Website

Sriram Subramaniam, Ph.D.

Portait Photo of Sriram Subramaniam
Laboratory of Cell Biology
Head, Biophysics Section
Senior Investigator
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 50, Room 4306
Bethesda, MD 20892-8008
Phone:  
301-594-2062
Fax:  
301-480-3834
E-Mail:  
subramas@mail.nih.gov

Biography

Dr. Sriram Subramaniam received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral training in the Departments of Chemistry and Biology at M.I.T. He is chief of the Biophysics Section in the Laboratory of Cell Biology at the Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute. He holds a visiting faculty appointment at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His current work is focused on the development of advanced technologies for imaging macromolecular assemblies using 3D electron microscopy, and their application to address fundamental problems in HIV/AIDS and cancer research.

Research

Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy at Molecular Resolution

For a more detailed description of our research program, please visit our lab's Web site at http://electron.nci.nih.gov.

The long-term mission of our research program is to obtain an integrated, quantitative understanding of cells and viruses at molecular resolution. We take an interdisciplinary approach to this problem by combining novel technologies for three-dimensional (3D) imaging with computational and cell biological tools. Our research efforts are presently focused on three areas: (1) determination of the structure and mechanisms underlying neutralization and cellular entry of HIV, (2) the development of automated, high-throughput workflows for structure determination of small, dynamic molecular complexes, and (3) the development of novel technologies for 3D imaging of cells and tissues, with particular emphasis on methods for understanding and diagnosing structural signatures of signal transduction and disease progression.

This page was last updated on 1/9/2014.