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Our Science – Shan Website

Zhihong Shan, M.D., Ph.D.

Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics
In Vitro Pathogenesis Section
Staff Scientist
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
Building 37, Room 4054
Bethesda, MD 20892-4255
Phone:  
301-594-2439
Fax:  
301-496-8709
E-Mail:  
shanz@mail.nih.gov

Biography

Dr. Zhihong Shan received his medical degree and MS degree from Kunming Medical College in China. From 1989 to 1994, Dr. Shan was a resident and attending physician at the First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College. Since 1995, he was supported by C. C. Wu Cultural & Education Foundation Fund (Hong Kong) for his Ph.D study at Institute of Human Genetics of University of Heidelberg (Germany). He obtained his Ph.D degree in 1998 from University of Heidelberg. From 1998 to 2000, he joined the laboratory of Dr. Thomas Haff as a research fellow at Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (Berlin). In 2000, Dr. Shan moved to National Cancer Institute at NIH as a visiting fellow. In 2002, he joined the group of Dr. Jonathan Wiest as a visiting fellow and research fellow at the Laboratory of Cellular Carcinogenesis and Tumor Promotion in National Cancer Institute. He continues to work under the direction of Dr. Jonathan Wiest as a staff scientist at In Vitro Pathogenesis Section of the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics. Dr. Shan was one of the recipients for the Fellows Award for Research Excellence (FARE, NIH) in 2004

Research

Dr. Shan's research focuses on identification of novel tumor suppressor gene(s) (TSGs) that localize to the D9S126 region on chromosome 9p. Current research expertise is centered on three interralated areas: functional characterization of TUSC1 as a tumor suppressor gene involved in lung tumorigenesis and perhaps other cancer types, identification of interacting proteins to TUSC1 protein and establishing a knock-out mouse model for TUSC1 gene.

This page was last updated on 3/5/2013.