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Research Directory

Dr. Joe Barchi
Dr. Joe Barchi
Structural Glycoconjugate Chemistry and NMR

Dr. Barchi received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Hawaii with Richard E. Moore and did 2 years of postdoctoral work at Duke University with Bert Fraser-Reid. He then joined the NCI as a staff fellow in 1988, was promoted to staff scientist and then to senior scientist in 2002. His main research interests are in synthetic medicinal chemistry as it relates to carbohydrate-based drug design, and the high-resolution structural analysis of sugars, glycopeptides and small molecule drug candidates by NMR spectroscopy.
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Dr. Terry Burke
Dr. Terry Burke
Bioorganic Chemistry

Dr. Burke received his B.S. in Chemistry from St. Martin's College, followed by his Ph.D. degree from the University of Washington under the direction of Professor Wendel Nelson. He then studied as a Fellow of the Pharmacology Associate Research Training Program in the Laboratory of Dr. Lance Pohl, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and subsequently under the direction of Dr. Kenner Rice as a Senior Staff Fellow of the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases. He briefly left the NIH to serve as Principal Chemist of Peptide Technologies Corporation before returning in 1989 as a tenured Principal Investigator in the Chemical Biology Laboratory (previously, the Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry). In 2002 he became Head of the Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Section and in 2003 he was appointed a member of the Senior Biomedical Research Service (SBRS).
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Dr. Jeff Gildersleeve
Dr. Jeff Gildersleeve
Chemical Glycobiology

Jeff Gildersleeve obtained his B.S. degree in biology in 1993 from the University of California at San Diego. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry at Princeton University under the guidance of Professor Dan Kahne, and completed postdoctoral training with Professor Peter Schultz at The Scripps Research Institute. In the summer of 2003, he began his current position as a Principal Investigator in the Chemical Biology Laboratory (formerly the Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry). The Gildersleeve group uses chemical approaches and glycan microarray technology to study the roles of anti-carbohydrate immune responses in the development, progression, and treatment of cancer and HIV. Dr. Gildersleeve is a recipient of the 2006 NCI Director's Innovation Award and the 2011 David Y. Gin New Investigator Award from the Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry of the American Chemical Society.
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Dr. Larry Keefer
Dr. Larry Keefer
Drug Design

Dr. Keefer received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of New Hampshire in 1966 and held research positions at the Chicago Medical School and the University of Nebraska College of Medicine before joining the NCI staff in 1971.
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Dr. Jim Kelley
Dr. Jim Kelley
Analytical Chemistry

Dr. Kelley received his B.S. in Chemistry from Wabash College followed by his Ph.D. in Analytical Organic Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the guidance of Klaus Biemann, with whom he developed some of the first methodology for sequencing peptides by mass spectrometry. He joined NIH in 1976 as a member of the Drug Design and Chemistry Section, the precursor organization of the current Chemical Biology Laboratory. His research has involved the application of mass spectrometry and high-performance separations to chemical, biochemical, pharmacological and clinical problems in new antitumor and anti-AIDS drug discovery and development. He is also an Instructor for Chemistry 318 (Introduction to Mass Spectrometry in Biomedical Research) for the FAES Graduate School at NIH, an Organizer and Instructor of a short course entitled 'Interpretation of Mass Spectra' for the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, and an Instructor for a tutorial series entitled 'Introduction to Biological Mass Spectrometry' for the NCI-Frederick Mass Spectrometry Interest Group.
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Dr. Jordan L. Meier
Dr. Jordan L. Meier
Chemical Genomics

Dr. Meier received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Creighton University in 2004, getting introduced to research as an National Science Foundation REU student. Following graduation he moved to the University of California-San Diego, performing graduate research in natural products biochemistry and proteomics under the mentorship of Professor Michael D. Burkart. After receiving his Ph.D. in chemistry in 2009, he moved to the California Institute of Technology. His research as an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Professor Peter B. Dervan focused on the development of high-throughput sequencing methods to analyze small molecule-DNA interactions.

In 2013, Dr. Meier joined the NCI, where his research focuses on the development of synthetic probes to investigate metabolic and epigenetic signaling pathways in cancer.
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Dr. Marc Nicklaus
Dr. Marc Nicklaus
Computer-Aided Drug Design

Dr. Nicklaus received his Ph.D. in applied physics from the Eberhards-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany, and then served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Modeling Section of the then called Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, NCI. He became a staff fellow in 1998, and a Senior Scientist in 2002. In 2000, he founded, and has been heading since then, the Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD) Group.
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Dr. John 'Jay' Schneekloth
Dr. John 'Jay' Schneekloth
Chemical Genetics

Dr. Schneekloth received his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College in 2001, where he worked with Prof. Gordon Gribble. He then moved to Yale University and obtained a Ph.D. from the chemistry department with Prof. Craig Crews in 2006. As a graduate student he studied natural product total synthesis and chemical biology relating to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. He then pursued an NIH postdoctoral fellowship with Prof. Erik Sorensen at Princeton University, where he worked on the development of a new multicomponent reaction and the application of this reaction to the synthesis of analgesic natural products. He returned to Yale in 2009 where he worked as a medicinal chemist at the Yale Small Molecule Discovery Center.
In 2011, Dr. Schneekloth joined NCI where his research involves using synthetic chemistry and high throughput chemical biology approaches to develop chemical probes of signal transduction pathways and gene expression. Specific areas of interest include protein sumoylation (including mechanistic probes, natural products, and synthetic inhibitors) and the use of small molecule microarrays to identify RNA- and DNA-binding small molecules.
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Dr. Joel Schneider
Dr. Joel Schneider
Peptide Design and Materials

Dr. Schneider received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Texas A&M University with Jeffery Kelly and then went on to the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics where he was a George W. Raiziss Fellow with William DeGrado studying protein design. In 1999, he began his independent career at the University of Delaware as an assistant professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and was promoted to associate and then full professor in 2009 with a secondary appointment in Materials Science and Engineering. He joined the NCI in 2010 as lab Chief of the newly established Chemical Biology Laboratory. He currently serves as Editor in Chief of Biopolymers-Peptide Science, the journal of the American Peptide Society.
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Dr. Martin Schnermann
Dr. Martin Schnermann
Organic Synthesis

Dr. Schnermann attended Colby College and graduated in 2002 with degrees in Chemistry (honors with Prof. Dasan Thamattoor) and Physics. After a year at Pfizer Research and Development (Groton, CT) as an associate in the medicinal chemistry division, he moved to the Scripps Research Institute. During his graduate studies, he performed research on the total synthesis and biological evaluation of anticancer natural products with Prof. Dale Boger and obtained a Ph.D. in 2008. He then completed an NIH-postdoctoral fellowship with Prof. Larry Overman at the University of California, Irvine. At Irvine, he developed light-mediated reactions to enable the synthesis of complex natural products. In addition, working with Prof. Christine Suetterlin, he pursued chemical biology and imaging studies of organelle specific probes. In 2012, Dr. Schnermann joined the NCI where his research focuses on the synthesis and development of new small-molecule imaging agents for cancer treatment and diagnosis.
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Dr. Craig Thomas
Dr. Craig Thomas
Chemistry Technology

Craig Thomas received his BS from the University of Indianapolis in 1995 and received an MS degree and Ph.D. from Syracuse University in 2000. He then undertook a post-doctoral work in the laboratories of Dr. Sidney Hecht at the University of Virginia where he earned a fellowship through the American Cancer Society. From there, he moved the NIH where he directed the chemical biology core of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. In 2007, he moved to the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (currently the NIH Center for Advancing Translational Sciences) where he serves as the group leader of chemistry technologies.
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